PDA

View Full Version : Too much electricity in my body! (?)


Ottis
25th January 2008, 05:05 PM
I recently bought my first MP3 player and started listening to the Skeptoid podcast, (among others) and the most recent edition, Magic Jewelry (Skeptoid #84), prompted me to e-mail Brian Dunning about something I've been told all my life. He directed me to post here.

It seems that I have too much electricity in my body.... This is even worse then my (half) brothers condition, he has too much magnetism in his, (so my parents always told us) no, not the animal type that attracts the ladies. (tho he has a number of x-wives, :p thatís not what they meant)...

Well, too the point.
Since I was a teenager I have not been able to wear a battery powered watch, at least not without a thick leather band underneath. When I have tried, the battery drains in a few days to maybe a week. Recently I hung my MP3 player (a Sandisk Sansa e260 with a metal back plate) on a leather cord around my neck, under my shirt, to hide it from my boss. The built in rechargeable battery which normally lasts about 20 hours died in less then 4.
I'm 42 years old and first noticed this "condition" at age 14 or 15. My parents always told me I had too much electricity in my body, probably because I had been shocked one too many times by the old vacuum -tube type TVs and radios I was always tinkering with as a kid... Like I'm a battery or something...:boggled:
My older brother can't wear a mechanical (wind-up) watch because he magnetizes the mainspring (or something) in a few days. He doesn't have any trouble with the battery powered quartz variety..

Iíve never known my brother to get stuck to flag poles, and the only time I might shock someone is to tell them Iím an atheist, (sp?) as well as a skeptic...

I have never heard a reasonable explanation of why this happens. I'm sure it has something to do with the acidity, or amount of salt in my sweat. I canít even guess how my brother manages to magnetize something. A lot of people have told me that they have head of these conditions, but Iíve never met anyone who has it.

Makes me wonder what will happen if I ever need to get a pace maker.

This "condition" is easy (but time consuming) to repeat, happens every time I wear a metal, battery powered watch that touches my skin.
I'm sure there is a reasonable, logical explanation for this, I just don't know what it is.

I DO NOT claim to be psychic or paranormal in any way. (but If Randy wants to give me money, I wont turn it down!! :rolleyes: )
The watches I have worn were always in good condition and not worn while showering, swimming or even sleeping. I don't have any problems with plastic or wind-up mechanical watches.

About me;
White male, 42 years old. Married 14 years.
Have always lived in rural areas, but not always in the same place.
Never worked in any chemical, nuclear, or power generating plants.
I have worked at a sawmill for the past 14 years, at a state park before that.
I've always worked outside year around, and sweat a lot in the summer. I'm sure this has something to do with it.
I have no pins or screws holding me together, and no fillings in my teeth.
I always wear rubber soled work or hiking boots.

Just curious if anyone knew anything about this, Thanks for your time.

casebro
25th January 2008, 05:31 PM
You're nuts?

If you have too much electricity, it wouldn't drain the battery- it would interfere with the function of the device. Cause noise, or in the case if digits, loose them, making no sound at all.

So how about doing a little experiment. Get fresh batteries, and time how long they last outside your shirt- tomorrow is Saturday, no boss around. Actually write down the time you start and the batts die. Then try another set, this time inside the shirt. Do not change any settings on the gismo. If you recharge, try it a couple times each way- charges may vary with the temperature, humidity, body temp, activity levels. Come back to us with a bunch of data.

bokonon
25th January 2008, 05:43 PM
No fillings in your teeth? That's amazing.

Ottis
25th January 2008, 05:46 PM
The device has to be touching my skin, I carry my MP3 player in my t-shirt pocket all the time with no effect. I can wear a battery watch as long as there is a band (non metal) between the watch and my wrist.
My parents said the thing about too much electricity, I don't buy that explanation. I'm at a loss to explain it.
I hadn't really thought about this for years till I heard Brian Dunnings podcast a couple of days ago. It's just the way things have always been...
I don't own a wrist watch at this time, I'll time the batt life of my mp3 player tomorrow.
Normally the player lasts 3 days without recharging, about 6 hours a day total playing at 2/3 volume.

Ottis
25th January 2008, 05:57 PM
No fillings in your teeth? That's amazing.
Seems like some people like to blame fillings for all kins of stuff.. :rolleyes:
42 and good teeth, maybe Randi would give me a couple of bucks just for that.;)

korenyx
25th January 2008, 06:02 PM
I stop watches unless I put tape on the backs. It would take a couple weeks and I ruined three watches before I figured out what was happening.

IXP
25th January 2008, 06:11 PM
I suspect this is confirmation bias. You get an idea in your head (that your body adversely affects battery operated devices), and every confirming experience is remembered while contrary evidence is ignored.

The way to find out is to try some experiments in which you keep track of all results.

IXP

Olowkow
25th January 2008, 06:34 PM
I suspect this is confirmation bias. You get an idea in your head (that your body adversely affects battery operated devices), and every confirming experience is remembered while contrary evidence is ignored.

The way to find out is to try some experiments in which you keep track of all results.


Yes, a perfect example of "confirmation bias." Just like praying!

Electricity does not work that way, and humans (and other animals) cannot magnetize anything without a magnet or an electric current.

(Please, I know geese have magnets in their brain....);)

This is not up for debate, so something else is going on.

"Too much electricity" is a meaningless phrase. In order for electricity to do anything, you need a circuit first. If you honestly believe you have this ability, I would suggest that you test it as quoted above, many times, and, if successful, then apply for the MDC before it is gone.

I'm pretty confident that if you can stop a bunch of watches, or magnetize an iron bar, you could win the prize.

I suggest that your battery went bad, defective watch, etc.

P.S. Brian sent you to the right place!

Ottis
25th January 2008, 06:40 PM
I suspect this is confirmation bias. You get an idea in your head (that your body adversely affects battery operated devices), and every confirming experience is remembered while contrary evidence is ignored.

A skeptical answer, but I'll have to admit the chance (tho I feel a small chance) you're right.. :scared:

The way to find out is to try some experiments in which you keep track of all results.
Will do. :D

Olowkow
25th January 2008, 06:41 PM
Actually, it's the only way!

portlandatheist
25th January 2008, 06:50 PM
The device has to be touching my skin, I carry my MP3 player in my t-shirt pocket all the time with no effect. I can wear a battery watch as long as there is a band (non metal) between the watch and my wrist.
My parents said the thing about too much electricity, I don't buy that explanation. I'm at a loss to explain it.
I hadn't really thought about this for years till I heard Brian Dunnings podcast a couple of days ago. It's just the way things have always been...
I don't own a wrist watch at this time, I'll time the batt life of my mp3 player tomorrow.
Normally the player lasts 3 days without recharging, about 6 hours a day total playing at 2/3 volume.

You need a control. Before you theorize of what is causing this behavior, you need to first characterize the behavior itself. Measure how long it takes the iPod to drain on your body and then recruit someone else to do the same experiment and see how it compares. Can you establish a significant difference? Are you sure its the person and not the battery, device, temperature, or some other factor you have not accounted for?

quarky
26th January 2008, 07:41 AM
Almost every hi-tek appliance I've ever had has crapped out unexpectedly.
I just figured it was cheap junk from China.

Ivor the Engineer
26th January 2008, 08:07 AM
Stop putting your watch in the glass with your dentures at night.;)

luchog
26th January 2008, 03:29 PM
This reminds me of a friend I used to have. He was completely unable to use any laptop touchpad pointing device; or the computer would crash shortly afterwards. No one believed this was true. Most people assumed that there was either something wrong with his computer, or that the software he was using was buggy. So we tested him.

For the first test, we rebooted the laptop he was using, and had him do the exact same things he did previously, using the same software; only this time using a USB mouse and not the touchpad, for about 5-10 minutes. Everything worked fine. We then had him do the same thing with the touchpad, and within a minute the laptop blue-screened. So that eliminated the "buggy software" alternate explanation. We repeated the test, and this time he managed to go almost three minutes using the touchpad before the laptop crashed.

For the second test, we had someone else perform the same actions using the laptop touchpad, again for bout 5-10 minutes, with no problems. Then had him do something entirely different using the touchpad, and it crashed in a couple of minutes. Thus eliminating a faulty touchpad as the explanation.

Since this didn't necessarily eliminate the laptop or the OS (Windows XP Pro) as the source of the error, we attempted the same two tests on a completely different laptop, from a completely different manufacturer, running Linux (we had a third laptop handy, which was a different manufacturer, but also running WinXP Pro, so we didn't bother with that one). A laptops which had been in use for the last two hours, and had exhibited no problems whatsoever. In both tests, it worked fine with the mouse or keyboard, and anyone else could use the touchpad without difficulty; but as soon as he started using the touchpad, "Kernel Panic" (the Linux equivalent of a crash) occurred very soon. Someone else was using his laptop at the same time, and never experienced any difficulty.

The only explanation I can think of is that he had some sort of odd electrolyte imbalance, or and excess of something, that caused him to generate and abnormal electrostatic charge; which induced noise into the touchpad sensor and caused some sort of unhandleable hardware malfunction.

Jeff Corey
26th January 2008, 03:43 PM
Okay kids, you're grounded.

The Painter
26th January 2008, 03:54 PM
Can you put clamps on your nipples and jump start your own car?

Jeff Corey
26th January 2008, 03:58 PM
Sure, and never having to worry about your vibrator's battery running down.

korenyx
26th January 2008, 03:59 PM
I managed to stop three different watches that only had a small circle of metal on the back. When I finally got a watch that had a plastic back I had no problems. Every watch I have now has tape on the back and they don't stop unless I need to change the battery. I only have this problem with battery watches; the wind-up watch I used to have just wore out.

quarky
26th January 2008, 04:05 PM
This reminds me of a friend I used to have. He was completely unable to use any laptop touchpad pointing device; or the computer would crash shortly afterwards. No one believed this was true. Most people assumed that there was either something wrong with his computer, or that the software he was using was buggy. So we tested him.

For the first test, we rebooted the laptop he was using, and had him do the exact same things he did previously, using the same software; only this time using a USB mouse and not the touchpad, for about 5-10 minutes. Everything worked fine. We then had him do the same thing with the touchpad, and within a minute the laptop blue-screened. So that eliminated the "buggy software" alternate explanation. We repeated the test, and this time he managed to go almost three minutes using the touchpad before the laptop crashed.

For the second test, we had someone else perform the same actions using the laptop touchpad, again for bout 5-10 minutes, with no problems. Then had him do something entirely different using the touchpad, and it crashed in a couple of minutes. Thus eliminating a faulty touchpad as the explanation.

Since this didn't necessarily eliminate the laptop or the OS (Windows XP Pro) as the source of the error, we attempted the same two tests on a completely different laptop, from a completely different manufacturer, running Linux (we had a third laptop handy, which was a different manufacturer, but also running WinXP Pro, so we didn't bother with that one). A laptops which had been in use for the last two hours, and had exhibited no problems whatsoever. In both tests, it worked fine with the mouse or keyboard, and anyone else could use the touchpad without difficulty; but as soon as he started using the touchpad, "Kernel Panic" (the Linux equivalent of a crash) occurred very soon. Someone else was using his laptop at the same time, and never experienced any difficulty.

The only explanation I can think of is that he had some sort of odd electrolyte imbalance, or and excess of something, that caused him to generate and abnormal electrostatic charge; which induced noise into the touchpad sensor and caused some sort of unhandleable hardware malfunction.

born under a bad sign?

If there ever was a technology that was prone to subtle, almost-woo factors...it would be computors.

A cement truck, in comparison, has too much mass to be effected by the stray particles of thought.


(or does it?)

Furious Coder
26th January 2008, 04:19 PM
[QUOTE=luchog;3374000]This reminds me of a friend I used to have. ...QUOTE]

Sounds like poor experimenting. Were you accounting for how he was holding the laptop, or what he was touching?

It's amazing how rigorous testing must be, and how it must account for so many factors to be conclusive.

eowyn
26th January 2008, 04:43 PM
Years ago, when I stayed at a friends' house overnight, sleeping in the lounge room, I would find that my the battery in my watch would die in the next day or two. I only stayed three nights over a roughly two year period, and it happened each time. The watch was replaced during that time - straigh replacement with the same model for a separate reason under warranty - and it happened with both.

After the third time, I did wonder if there was something about that room.

quarky
26th January 2008, 05:07 PM
Sometimes, god simply doesn't like us.
And he messes with us.


well,
he messes with me, and my crappy purchases.

god can be a real dick sometimes.

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 06:30 AM
This has been bothering me lately also I have had 6 computers this year give out on me .
I dont know if I am puting out some kind of energy or not but this is geting costly .
If you guys find out if some of us are puting out some kind of energy let me know thats all I can figure what is happening .

e-sabbath
27th January 2008, 07:10 AM
Frankly, I've heard enough ancedotal stories about this sort of thing not to doubt it exists in some measurable way. I always thought it might have to do with a slightly acidic sweat creating a circuit between the body and the device. Same sort of thing that makes some people tarnish silver when worn.

robinson
27th January 2008, 07:12 AM
I have the opposite problem. Everything I touch or use works great. It might not be working when somebody else is using it, but as soon as I put my hands on a piece of equipment, it works great.

LordoftheLeftHand
27th January 2008, 07:35 AM
This has been bothering me lately also I have had 6 computers this year give out on me .
I dont know if I am puting out some kind of energy or not but this is geting costly .
If you guys find out if some of us are puting out some kind of energy let me know thats all I can figure what is happening .

This also happened to a friend of mine. Turned out there was a problem with the power in his home (LOTS of power spikes). Just because you can't figure out a mundane explanation, does not mean there isn't one.

LLH

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 07:59 AM
I dont think its a wireing problem I am useing a surge protector I am also useing a program to moniter the voltage on the computer with alarms in case it drops or goes up to high .
The power supplys are blowing for no reason moniters, video cards, modems are giveing out also Ive had at least 10 moniters go out on me .
Ive taken the power supplys apart to see why they are blowing I have found no shorts for them to ark like thay do .
I had one I thought was going to explode it was so loud .
I have never had a tv that lasted very long eather electronics just do not last around me .
I am even runing 2 power supplys right now to see if they blow .
Ive got one powering just the prosesser and the hard drives and one powering the 6 fans and dvd cd roms Ive got 2 dont ask me why .
These are the 6 inch 12 volt fans so they are cooling it real good so its not over heating .

LordoftheLeftHand
27th January 2008, 08:12 AM
Ive taken the power supplys apart to see why they are blowing I have found no shorts for them to ark like thay do.

So your saying your power supplies are breaking but there is nothing wrong with them?!? If there is nothing wrong with them, how are they broken?

LLH

Skeptic Guy
27th January 2008, 08:27 AM
I dont think its a wireing problem I am useing a surge protector I am also useing a program to moniter the voltage on the computer with alarms in case it drops or goes up to high .
The power supplys are blowing for no reason moniters, video cards, modems are giveing out also Ive had at least 10 moniters go out on me .
Ive taken the power supplys apart to see why they are blowing I have found no shorts for them to ark like thay do .
I had one I thought was going to explode it was so loud .
I have never had a tv that lasted very long eather electronics just do not last around me .
I am even runing 2 power supplys right now to see if they blow .
Ive got one powering just the prosesser and the hard drives and one powering the 6 fans and dvd cd roms Ive got 2 dont ask me why .
These are the 6 inch 12 volt fans so they are cooling it real good so its not over heating .

I have a feeling that taking apart the power supplies and running multiple power supplies on the same system may be contributing to your problems.

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 09:19 AM
I take them apart after they blow to see why I am not hooking them together they are runing seperate from each other to take the load off each other .
I am just spliting up the load each takes by runing less off them .
One is a 250 watt and one is a 200 watt I only needed 400 so its a little over kill .
Ive never ran 2 before I am trying it now to see what happens it seems to be working very good so far .
The fans are frezzing me out !

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 09:24 AM
They seem to be arking for no reason nothing is touching anything to make them ark like they do the power is just jumping .
When it happens sparks fly its a wonder they havent started a fire .

Primus
27th January 2008, 09:29 AM
Maybe your an X-man?

Just saying... i've seen the 3 documentaries at the cinema. We all know it happens!

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 09:40 AM
your going to have to help me out on that one x men is a comic book right ?

Primus
27th January 2008, 09:50 AM
It was originally a comic but i've only seen the films. They all had one superpower. But the goverment was contantly trying to kill them out of ignorance and fear. I would not like to be Ottis round about now. First you break your watch. Then the men in suits come to pay a visit!

Olowkow
27th January 2008, 10:31 AM
The power supplys are blowing for no reason moniters, video cards, modems are giveing out also Ive had at least 10 moniters go out on me .

Ten monitors in how many years? Mine has a 2 year warranty. Are these used monitors that were bought cheap? They probably had problems and were sold for that reason. Power supplies do not blow for "no reason". Dust accumlation is a killer. Blocked fans/heat. Had any lightening strikes?

Ive taken the power supplys apart to see why they are blowing I have found no shorts for them to ark like thay do .

Arcing should be visible. At 5 or 12 volts, arcing has to be due to loose or closely spaced wiring. Are you running on a gas powered generator? How can you check for shorts? Are you an electronics technician?

I had one I thought was going to explode it was so loud .

What kind of noise? Fan bearings? ....That's your problem...

I am even runing 2 power supplys right now to see if they blow .
Ive got one powering just the prosesser and the hard drives and one powering the 6 fans and dvd cd roms Ive got 2 dont ask me why .
These are the 6 inch 12 volt fans so they are cooling it real good so its not over heating .
Probably not a good idea unless you understand the connections very well.

Modified
27th January 2008, 10:52 AM
I have the opposite problem. Everything I touch or use works great. It might not be working when somebody else is using it, but as soon as I put my hands on a piece of equipment, it works great.

Are you a sysadmin?

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 11:02 AM
Ten monitors in how many years?
less then 3 years .
Had any lightening strikes?
no
No dust this machine is as clean as they get for a home system I keep my compresser with an air brush right beside it my fans run at top speed .
Arcing should be visible .
Yes its visable when it happens its not 5 or 12 volts its much more then that it pops like 110 volts or more .
I am runing off the grid and no I am not a technician just a basic knowlage of electronics .
When one blows I check them to see if any wires or circuits are touching if nothing is touching your right it should not blow .
Probably not a good idea unless you understand the connections very well.
That is why I am runing them in the first place I needed a power supply with a connection for the cpu .
The power supplys I had on hand did not have the conection for the cpu so I cut the connection off the 400 watt supply that blew and spliced it to the smaller one .
Its out of the box but it works !

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 11:08 AM
They wear polo shirts down here primus !

Olowkow
27th January 2008, 11:28 AM
Ten monitors in how many years?
less then 3 years .

Very odd. Replaced under warranty? Or bought at an auction? Just trying to help out here.:) I've been repairing electronics for 35 years. Are these old CRT monitors or flat panel ones? Have your ruled out a bad/intermittent video cable or video card?

No dust

Very good.

Arcing should be visible .
Yes its visable when it happens its not 5 or 12 volts its much more then that it pops like 110 volts or more .

Well, if it is visible, you should be able to see where it is arcing and repair it. Even 110 volts will not arc more than a few thousandths of an inch through air. Just take the PS case off, and turn out the lights and have a look.
What about the noise? Fan noise?

When one blows I check them to see if any wires or circuits are touching if nothing is touching your right it should not blow .

So, when it "blows", there is no 5 volts or 12 volts? Understand, that the early power supplies (these are all "switching supplies") needed to have a load in order to operate properly.

The power supplys I had on hand did not have the conection for the cpu so I cut the connection off the 400 watt supply that blew and spliced it to the smaller one .

I'm trying to ask the "right" questions. Bear with me.

"...I had on hand...", sounds like you bought a bunch used somewhere?
It really sounds to me like you are trying to get a computer going with a bunch of old junk, especially since you didn't comment when I asked. My recommendation is to just bite the bullet and buy a new one.

If anything in this world is impossible, having an electric field in your body that is causing all this havoc is impossible. Now, you really have to go from there as a starting point, or you are going to continue to be frustrated. Good luck!:)

Olowkow
27th January 2008, 11:48 AM
Just a few thoughts on "body magnetism". If this were possible, it would be very easy to test. You could take some iron filings, or just scrunch up some steel wool, to get a little pile of particles. Then place a piece of paper in your hand, or anywhere on the body, and sprinkle the iron on the paper (not directly on the skin, since there is grease and moisture on it.) If the particles stick, you are magnetic. :) And MDC ready!

Also, you would ruin your magnetic data on credit cards if you were magnetic.

technoextreme
27th January 2008, 11:56 AM
Since I was a teenager I have not been able to wear a battery powered watch, at least not without a thick leather band underneath. When I have tried, the battery drains in a few days to maybe a week. Recently I hung my MP3 player (a Sandisk Sansa e260 with a metal back plate) on a leather cord around my neck, under my shirt, to hide it from my boss. The built in rechargeable battery which normally lasts about 20 hours died in less then 4.
How long have you had this thing? I've got a perfectly logical explanation depending on how long you've had the MP3 player.

LordoftheLeftHand
27th January 2008, 11:58 AM
This has been bothering me lately also I have had 6 computers this year give out on me .
I dont know if I am puting out some kind of energy or not but this is geting costly .
If you guys find out if some of us are puting out some kind of energy let me know thats all I can figure what is happening .

Olowkow has already addressed this issue somewhat but I think it needs going over again. Six computers in 1 year? If they were new they should have still been under warrenty. Since you said its getting costly I assume these were not new units. I have to agree with Olowkow. You could have likely bought a few new computers by now for the money you've spent on these used ones and be done with this problem. Furthermore in the very unlikely case that there is something "wrong" with you that damages equipment, I would suggest only purchase products with very LONG warranties.

LLH

Creekfreak
27th January 2008, 12:20 PM
Yes your right most of the parts up untell now have been not so great nothing new just parts out of other computers .
This computer however is home built all from top of the line new parts by a gamer/tech freind I have .
He hardly ever used it becouse he was building a biger one right after he built this one .
So it was like new when I got it just dusty from siting but cleaned it and made some box modifications for more fans before I even started it .
I dout I am omiting enough energy to arc these things or I would have figured that out a long time ago .
There is no arcing before it happens it just happens it will arc and its all over with .
When this last one went it scared the hell out of me it was no 5 volt or 12 volt spark .

technoextreme
27th January 2008, 12:45 PM
Yes your right most of the parts up untell now have been not so great nothing new just parts out of other computers .
This computer however is home built all from top of the line new parts by a gamer/tech freind I have .
He hardly ever used it becouse he was building a biger one right after he built this one .
So it was like new when I got it just dusty from siting but cleaned it and made some box modifications for more fans before I even started it .
I dout I am omiting enough energy to arc these things or I would have figured that out a long time ago .
There is no arcing before it happens it just happens it will arc and its all over with .
When this last one went it scared the hell out of me it was no 5 volt or 12 volt spark .
A static electricity arc that you can't feel is strong enough to damage electrical components. The sad fact is that it can be a gradual failure.

Ivor the Engineer
27th January 2008, 12:55 PM
A static electricity arc that you can't feel is strong enough to damage electrical components. The sad fact is that it can be a gradual failure.

Damn right!

I fried the video memory in my laptop by zapping it with a static charge (I don't wear that jumper anymore). This was a gradual failure too. The initial zap caused the screen to go funny, but rebooting cleared it up. Then over the next few weeks it kept on coming back until one day the screen was completely corrupted. Fortunately it was still in warranty.

technoextreme
27th January 2008, 12:59 PM
Damn right!

I fried the video memory in my laptop by zapping it with a static charge (I don't wear that jumper anymore). This was a gradual failure too. The initial zap caused the screen to go funny, but rebooting cleared it up. Then over the next few weeks it kept on coming back until one day the screen was completely corrupted. Fortunately it was still in warranty.
Just out of curiosity how bad is sweat and the ilk to the electronics on the computer. I was told it was very corrosive but I was working on electronics directly cut from a die.

Ivor the Engineer
27th January 2008, 01:16 PM
Just out of curiosity how bad is sweat and the ilk to the electronics on the computer. I was told it was very corrosive b I've been working on electronics directly cut from the die.

I think it depends on the individual, but in general sweat is considered highly corrosive.

http://www.vtt.fi/inf/pdf/publications/2007/P626.pdf

Human emissions from breathing, palm sweat and grease, hair, dandruff and skin care lotions contain chemicals which can have corroding qualities or qualities softening plastic. These chemicals include for example carbon dioxide, aldehyde, methane, skin creams, powders, solvents in perfumes. In addition, cigarettes release tar, ammonia, acetone, formaldehyde and nitrogen oxides. The aldehydes in human breath and sweat penetrate silicon rubber, which is used for membrane keyboards, for instance. Silicone rubber also reacts with aldehydes and can secrete like glue compounds, which are harmful for the operation of the keys.

quarky
27th January 2008, 03:01 PM
Random events have clumps in them. Like, you could go 3 years without a flat tire, and then have 3 in one week. If these random events were spaced evenly, they wouldn't be random. So we should expect reports of this nature...several appliances crashing in a short time...especially because we don't usually hear from the folks that just have the regular amount of malfunctioning gizmos.

People that are crop circle believers often report malfunctioning equipment at a fresh site. I'd guess that the ones who's watches work fine in the circle tend not to notice or mention it.

Ottis
27th January 2008, 07:08 PM
How long have you had this thing? I've got a perfectly logical explanation depending on how long you've had the MP3 player.

I've had the Sansa a little over a year. I started to do some testing over the weekend, bought a new watch (wearing it now, first one in twenty years, so far so good) tested the batt life of my mp3 player, 18+ hrs at 50% volume (default level) continuous playing (played 300 songs before it quit, at an average of 4 min each, comes to 20 hrs.). Will wear it under my shirt tomorrow... My wife has agreed to take a turn wearing it to see how the batt life compares, so we can see any difference. Also bought a spare battery for my Sansa, unlike an iPod they have a user replaceable battery. will try it with both batterys. If my watch dies in a week or so I'll put a new battery in it an try again...
I'll post the results as they come up, even if they say I'm full of crap. :boggled:

Ottis
27th January 2008, 07:30 PM
Random events have clumps in them. Like, you could go 3 years without a flat tire, and then have 3 in one week.....

You got that right, between my wife and I we have four cars, I have a 4x4 pickup for when the snow gets too deep, a 1973 Lincoln Continental that I'm restoring (and driving), and a POS '85 ford escort I drive to work, for the gas millage. about two months ago, in a period of about two weeks they all broke down. :covereyes Waterpump on my truck, alternator on my Lincoln, power steering on my escort, then and the crank pulley (harmonic balancer) on my wifes tempo broke.. If I believed in god I'd think he hates me....

Rolfe
28th January 2008, 02:14 AM
I had a problem with watches giving up on me when I was a kid. <snip detailed account given in earlier thread> I was pretty certain it was something about me causing them to break down. Problem stopped when I bought a nurse's watch and pinned it to my jacket instead of wearing a wristwatch. Problem stopped permanently when I got a quartz watch.

I recounted this is another thread some time ago, and a number of posters, including one watchmaker, persuaded me it was impossible for my wrist to have any weird aura that was stopping watches, and that I had just been a careless kid with my watches.

I expect they were right.

Rolfe.

Rolfe
28th January 2008, 02:20 AM
Random events have clumps in them. Like, you could go 3 years without a flat tire, and then have 3 in one week. If these random events were spaced evenly, they wouldn't be random. So we should expect reports of this nature...several appliances crashing in a short time...especially because we don't usually hear from the folks that just have the regular amount of malfunctioning gizmos.


Hmmm. A few years ago I was given a 14" TV with integral DVD player as a birthday present. The DVD player kept malfunctioning. The shop replaced the item. The second one malfunctioned. They replaced that as well. The third's DVD player was perfect, but there was a fault with the tube (streaks of colour in the bottom left corner). They replaced that. I asked if they had to replace many of these things. They said no, it was just me! I don't know if they were entirely truthful or not, but I'll bet they didn't have to give out four TVs to get one functioning model for every customer. The fourth one, the one I still have, doesn't always play the DVDs properly, but it's better than the first two, and the tube's OK, so I decided to quit while I was (more or less) ahead.

Rolfe.

JWideman
28th January 2008, 05:41 AM
To the guy with the computer next to the running airbrush compressor... Don't those generate a lot of static electricity?

As for the OP, the human body doesn't store electricity. It does, however, conduct it - some folks better than others. An old teacher of mine would say you have a lot of potential.

e-sabbath
28th January 2008, 06:30 AM
That's why I think it might be acidic sweat doing it.

robinson
28th January 2008, 07:36 AM
As for the OP, the human body doesn't store electricity.

That is not true.

Creekfreak
28th January 2008, 09:40 AM
Its a small compresser and its never runing when the computer is on .

Your right about the acid on your skin ive had problems before from touching cards in the worng place .
I learned this from a man the worked for IBM for 30 years back in the old days .
They flew him all over the world to work on the super computers .
I was haveing problems with my first computer it was junk but there where many expert man hours spent keeping it going .
Anyway no one could figure out why it was doing what it was doing then Ted the head shows up out here needing a place to stay for a few days .
So Ted says let me take a look at it he messed with it for a little while then pulled out the video card and there was a very small amount of rust on the slot connection .
To fix it all it took was a peace of sand paper to clean it off he told me that was from it being touched .and of course liveing in a swamp doesent help any !

Olowkow
28th January 2008, 04:22 PM
...he messed with it for a little while then pulled out the video card and there was a very small amount of rust on the slot connection .
To fix it all it took was a peace of sand paper to clean it off he told me that was from it being touched .and of course liveing in a swamp doesent help any !

All the connections are gold plated copper. Can't rust. But dirt can migrate into the edge connector pins. We call it "grungus". Sand paper is asking for trouble! :eek: Use a soft pencil eraser, then clean with ethyl or methyl alcohol, pure, not "rubbing alcohol". "Moonshine" is a good start.

If the "rust" was green, it means the copper under the gold is being attacked.
Not good. I will make a wild guess...this board was kept in a chicken coop before you bought it.

Is your computer possibly close to the kitchen? Cooking grease in the air is a killer for computers. Yes, the swamp could be a problem.

Can't rule out bigfoot playing tricks! :)

Olowkow
28th January 2008, 04:25 PM
That is not true.

How does the body "store electricity"? Am I missing something?

robinson
28th January 2008, 04:29 PM
Try shuffling your feet on carpet. Then touch something metal, or for more fun, somebodies ear.

Olowkow
28th January 2008, 04:30 PM
Hmmm. The third's DVD player was perfect, but there was a fault with the tube (streaks of colour in the bottom left corner). They replaced that. I asked if they had to replace many of these things. They said no, it was just me!

If you had the TV CRT too close to your speakers, the magnets in the speakers will cause color streaks in the picture. The magnets are pulling on the electrons trying to make it to the front of the screen, and deflecting their path.

Olowkow
28th January 2008, 04:32 PM
Try shuffling your feet on carpet. Then touch something metal, or for more fun, somebodies ear.

Touchť! :) But static electricity probably can't stop mechanical watches.

Back on thread:
Getting a mechanical watch close to a magnet will stop it by magnetizing moving parts that are even slightly ferromagnetic, like some brass. It is easy to demagnitize a watch if you have an old VHS tape eraser, or a degaussing coil. Handling speaker drivers, I stopped my Timex years ago. Just ran the tape eraser over it and it lasted another 10 years.

Getting too near an NMR magnet will do the trick for sure!

Another thing to suspect is using a hammer. I doubt that watches are designed to sustain a lot of G forces.

robinson
28th January 2008, 05:26 PM
I thought this topic was about semiconductor devices. Most are extremely sensitive to the presence of static electricity and can be damaged by a static discharge.

I don't know how static charge could drain batteries, but some people may carry a static charge. Clothes, shoes, who knows. But keep them away from my equipment please.

Olowkow
28th January 2008, 06:15 PM
I thought this topic was about semiconductor devices. Most are extremely sensitive to the presence of static electricity and can be damaged by a static discharge.

I don't know how static charge could drain batteries, but some people may carry a static charge. Clothes, shoes, who knows. But keep them away from my equipment please.

Right, static charge is the result of the combination of flooring, clothes and shoes and low humidity. I have seen some rooms that were just awful, painful shocks.
One classroom had about 30 flat panel monitors on a network which would all reset when anyone zapped anything in the room.

I think I had this one in my brain when I was writing about magnets and watches.

Problem stopped permanently when I got a quartz watch.
Rolfe.

I pictured that he meant LCD.:confused:

e-sabbath
28th January 2008, 08:09 PM
The hammer/jackhammer/shotgun/vibration issue is precisely why I swear by the Casio G-Shock watches. I've only manage to kill one of them, and that was the time it got hit by a bus. (I'm standing on 34th, someone asked me where something was, I pointed off to the side, just as the bus stopped. Sprained the heck out of my wrist, spun me around like a top, the dial leaked, but the rest of the watch still worked: I could see hours and the tens digit of the minutes.)

Rolfe
29th January 2008, 02:43 AM
If you had the TV CRT too close to your speakers, the magnets in the speakers will cause color streaks in the picture. The magnets are pulling on the electrons trying to make it to the front of the screen, and deflecting their path.


Nah, I know what that looks like, and this wasn't the same. This was a bedroom TV, mounted on a wall bracket, with no speakers anywhere near. It was an odd effect - from below, the affected area looked like a red streak. It was only back in the shop, with the thing on the floor, that I realised from above, it was a blue streak. There was no distortion of the picture, only the colour problem.

Rolfe.

MRC_Hans
29th January 2008, 06:26 AM
Mmmm... commenting on the OP:

Battery life.... Except, possibly for a strong RF (radio frequency field) there is nothing electrical that can influence the power consumption (and thus battery life) of a battery device. So it is not only that there is no known property of the human body; there is no such effect at all. Any strong RF, magnetic, or electrostatical fields that could make a considerabel difference would do so by interefering with the normal function of the device, which would almost certainly be noticeable.

If there is an effect at all, it might be due to temperature. If you have the device touching your skin, it will be considerably warmer than worn outside clothing (I notice Ottis, who appears to be a true sceptic, has allowed or this in his experiments, as his wife will be using the device under her shirt as a control - good thinking -). Now temperature ought not, but might influence the power consumption.

I used to be a watch-killer myself. Both mechanic and electronic. Once I got one of sufficient quality that stopped (perhaps being less active with various tools has also helped, now a days, I mostly fly a desk).

Hans

MRC_Hans
29th January 2008, 06:31 AM
Nah, I know what that looks like, and this wasn't the same. This was a bedroom TV, mounted on a wall bracket, with no speakers anywhere near. It was an odd effect - from below, the affected area looked like a red streak. It was only back in the shop, with the thing on the floor, that I realised from above, it was a blue streak. There was no distortion of the picture, only the colour problem.

Rolfe.Sounds very much like a magnetic problem. Viewing angle should not matter for a CRT, but if there was an external magnet field, you could get that effect. Once removed from the field (and in the shop), the magnetization left in the CRT may give a different colour abbaration.

In colour CRTs, there is a a mask screen just behind the phospherous layer which is supposed to ensure that the red dots only "see" the "red" electron cannon, etc. If that gets magnetized, you see funny effects.

Hans

Rolfe
29th January 2008, 06:52 AM
Well, if it was a magnetic effect, it was something that happened before I bought it, and that remained constant during several weeks of use. Whatever the cause, it appeared to be a permanent flaw.

When I took it back to the shop the assistant put on a DVD that had a blank screen at the beginning, and it was then, with the set on the floor, that I noticed that the area I'd complained of as being red (I'd had it on a wall bracket, high up, in my bedroom) was now blue. We then tried looking at it from different angles, and the offending streak was red from below and blue from above.

Rolfe.

Olowkow
29th January 2008, 04:02 PM
We then tried looking at it from different angles, and the offending streak was red from below and blue from above.

Rolfe.

Broken! Warranty repair!

Actually, the little magnets that they glue onto the crt near the deflection coil to compensate for minor deflection problems probably came loose. Bad luck!

Rolfe
30th January 2008, 04:06 AM
Actually, broken, warranty replacement.

The annoying thing was that this was the only one which had a perfectly-functioning DVD player. The rest of the series of returns were because of faults with the DVD side of things. I'll say this for the shop, once I'd convinced them that there actually was a fault each time, they didn't quibble about replacing the item.

Rolfe.

JWideman
30th January 2008, 05:58 AM
Try shuffling your feet on carpet. Then touch something metal, or for more fun, somebodies ear.

That's just an electron imbalance. Once discharged, balance is restored.

Cuddles
30th January 2008, 06:25 AM
The thing about the OP and some of the other anecdotes is that they don't actually make any sense. Watches aren't wired into your wrist. Mp3 players don't have external contacts. Neither do touchpads. There is no way touching the outside of any of these things could do anything to the insides because they're not connected. If they are connected, or if you have a big enough charge to get arcing, you're really going to know about it.

Ottis
30th January 2008, 11:50 AM
Well, so far so bad, or good depending on your POV. My watch is still running and wearing my mp3 player under my shirt didn't have much, if any, affect on its play time.. BUT, it's winter here and hasn't been above 40F in a month or more. So, either I'm full-o-bull or it has something to do with my sweat. So I guess I'll have to wait for summer to do the final testing. Sweating won't be hard this summer, I'm in the process of changing jobs, and I'll soon be a fireman on a steam locomotive at the Cass Scenic Rail Road State Park. Shoveling coal behind the boiler of a 90 ton steam engine all day should do the trick..
.....Mp3 players don't have external contacts......
That got me thinking, mine kinda' does. My Sansa e260 series has an open connection port on the bottom for the charge/ sync cable. I was sweating at the time (it was mid summer, and like I said, I work outside year-round). Enough sweat on the contacts and it could cause a drain on the batt., I guess.....

quarky
30th January 2008, 09:00 PM
gizmos have been crapping out ever since they were invented,

planned obsolesence sounds conspiratorial?

fine.

what about the general background state of stuff crapping out?
(isn't there some law of thermodynamics that mentions this?)

I'd be more entertained by the woo of appliances lasting unusally long.

I had a datsun b-210 that wouldn't die. after 300,000 miles, i had to retire it because it looked to rough to be seen in public. I didn't even change the oil once every 50,000 miles. In retrospect, I wish I had entered it into the challange.

For me, the woo hot-spot is alarm clocks. They fail in my presence, repeatedly.

but I hate them, and that might have an affect.

(I loved my b-210, partly because I bought it used for 250 bucks. Love may be the key in this. Love and hate)

luchog
1st February 2008, 11:49 PM
[QUOTE=luchog;3374000]This reminds me of a friend I used to have. ...QUOTE]

Sounds like poor experimenting. Were you accounting for how he was holding the laptop, or what he was touching?

It's amazing how rigorous testing must be, and how it must account for so many factors to be conclusive.
Yup, we tested the laptops on different tables, and using different power outlets. No one was holding the laptops in their laps, they were all sitting on tables of some sort.

We didn't control for clothing, but I don't recall him wearing any wool, and it was in the summer so it's highly unlikely that his clothing was generating significant amounts of static electricity.

luchog
1st February 2008, 11:51 PM
Frankly, I've heard enough ancedotal stories about this sort of thing not to doubt it exists in some measurable way. I always thought it might have to do with a slightly acidic sweat creating a circuit between the body and the device. Same sort of thing that makes some people tarnish silver when worn.

Actually, that's one factor that didn't occur to us at the time. Might have been a good explanation. Or he may have been secreting an abnormally high amount of electrolytes in his sweat as well.

luchog
2nd February 2008, 12:03 AM
The hammer/jackhammer/shotgun/vibration issue is precisely why I swear by the Casio G-Shock watches. I've only manage to kill one of them, and that was the time it got hit by a bus
Ditto for the Timex Ironman Triathlon watch. One of those babies got me through Army training and a whole lot of abuse for years afterwards; before finally giving out because one of the electronic components went bad.

robinson
19th February 2008, 01:10 PM
Thread killer.

Ottis
21st July 2008, 08:19 PM
Well, it's been about 6 months sense I first posted, its been a hot summer and my watch is still keeping good time. My MP3 player is still fine weather my wife or I use it.
I guess I had a string of defective (cheep) watches as a teen, and more recently, sweat in the charging/sync port of my MP3 player, a garden variety case of Conformation Bias I guess..
Oh well, live and learn!

steph7441
3rd May 2011, 09:00 PM
Hi Im epilepic I have a mix of Generalized Vocal Seizures... I get an Aura before Mine kick in... Anyway My EEG's were something else they said t[HTML]hat my brain activity was so fast and constant and my waves were really high and strong. Well I I have killed every cell phone I have ever had with in about 6 months or less of owning them among other things.. I have been looking for others that have this problem for years and this is the first I have found any information on this and Im beyond ecstatic to be finding out more about this like what causes it and such as humans we are conductors of electricity due to being mostly water but being able to make to make so much energy that it disrupts our electronics is something else. LOL I almost feel like I have found a support group....

Sunsneezer
3rd May 2011, 09:18 PM
If you want to test your MP3 player's battery with more precision, I suggest you install the rockbox custom formware on it. (http://www.rockbox.org/)
I have the same player as you, and I like that Rockbox actually displays a percentage for battery life and even estimates the time left.

Andrew Wiggin
3rd May 2011, 09:27 PM
Thread necromancy.

Dancing David
4th May 2011, 04:46 AM
Welcome steph7441,

It would be really hard to show that under controlled settings. First off your body does not generate electricity in the usual sense of electrical current flowing in a wire.

It used biphasic osmotic pressure in a biochemical sequence of events. You have ions in the body, some are positive K++, Na+ and some negative Cl-. What happens in the channels and gates pump the sodium and potassium in and the chlorides out. This creates a very small differential between the cell membrane and the intracellular fluid. When a neuron gets the signal to 'fire', it releases the K/Na and uptakes the Cl, so the standing potential of the cell neutralizes.

This then causes the cell to release neurotransmitter at the post synaptic cleft and transmission at dendritic contacts. neither of which are electrical in nature. They are biochemical transmission.

So while the very small shift from potentiated to neutral creates the electrical signal that an EEG detects. It is many orders of magnitude smaller than the electrical signals from say your toaster or a refrigerator.

calebprime
4th May 2011, 05:39 AM
Hi Im epilepic I have a mix of Generalized Vocal Seizures... I get an Aura before Mine kick in... Anyway My EEG's were something else they said t[HTML]hat my brain activity was so fast and constant and my waves were really high and strong. Well I I have killed every cell phone I have ever had with in about 6 months or less of owning them among other things.. I have been looking for others that have this problem for years and this is the first I have found any information on this and Im beyond ecstatic to be finding out more about this like what causes it and such as humans we are conductors of electricity due to being mostly water but being able to make to make so much energy that it disrupts our electronics is something else. LOL I almost feel like I have found a support group....

So, Generalized and Focal (Seizures) seem like opposites.

Do you mean you have seizures that start in some area, and then spread?

eta: found this:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6T0V-482YFG1-18&_user=10&_coverDate=12%2F31%2F1988&_rdoc=1&_fmt=high&_orig=gateway&_origin=gateway&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=1740399320&_rerunOrigin=scholar.google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=be83fb41e8465027e8de85a55a270431&searchtype=a

eta: Can't fix this link, for some reason, grr.

Abstract:
The investigation of the mechanisms that cause seizures to suddenly arise in a generalized fashion all over the brain has received less attention in epilepsy research than studies on the cellular mechanisms causing partial (focal) epilepsy, where a small group of neurons is thought to give rise to localized epileptic discharge. In experimental models of partial epilepsy, an important role has been assigned to failure of postsynaptic inhibition as a mechanism underlying even the most minimal manifestations of epileptic discharge. Studies on feline generalized penicillin epilepsy, which resembles a common form of human generalized epilepsy characterized by absence attacks, suggest that its underlying mechanism might be different and that inhibition may play an important role in the mechanism of some forms of generalized epileptic discharge.