PDA

View Full Version : Ident-A-Kid: Friend or Foe?


aabrown1971
27th February 2010, 11:12 PM
Hello All,

I'm hoping this is the best place to post this. If not, please recommend...

I was just looking at my Kindergartner's weekly schedule for next week,
and for March 4th, there is written "Ident-A-Kid". I did a google search, and
it turned up a site for a company that fingerprints kids. (I haven't posted
enough here to put URLs in my posts yet, so please google it if you're
unfamiliar)

I'm a little weary about having my 5 year old fingerprinted. Does anyone
have any knowledge about this company? Would anyone else reading this be
a little weary? I'm the guy who makes fun of the "mark-o-the-beast" crazies,
so that is not where I'm coming from.

Any info (soon) would be great. Thanks.

Alt+F4
28th February 2010, 06:29 AM
Sounds like a bunch of fear mongering to me.

The danger of a child being lost or abducted is a very real and disturbing concern for parents today.

You could just as easily take your kid's fingerprints and home and you already have the photos and info. I'd be afraid that the Indet-A-Kid people would scare my child.

I'd be curious to know if their product resulted in the finding of a kidnapped child.

Alt+F4
28th February 2010, 06:34 AM
Also this accusation from a parent in Idaho that:

Ident-A-Kid is not an organization with a legitimate board of directors. It sells franchises to privateers. The "agent" obtaining the child’s information does not have the proper credentials lawfully authorizing them to obtain fingerprints.

She also goes on to say that Ident-A-Kid retains owership of the personal information obtain from the children.

http://proliberty.com/observer/20070619.htm

bluesjnr
28th February 2010, 06:40 AM
I cannot see any benefit here whatsoever. None.

stup_id
28th February 2010, 06:58 AM
I cannot see any benefit here whatsoever. None.

Exactly.. what`s up with that?... are you gonna fingerprint the broken lamp and then call those guys to check wether or not your toddler broke it?... because that´s the only scenario I can think of that it is useful...

Safe-Keeper
28th February 2010, 09:41 AM
Surely if it pays to have your kid fingerprinted, say, for identification should he or she (knock on wood) turn up dead, then the police is the place to go? Why go to a private firm that you've never heard of?

Or, as was pointed out, do it yourself.

JWideman
28th February 2010, 10:02 AM
My wife and I did this years ago. You get a laminated photo of your kid, with their thumb print on the back, and it looks like an ID card with information such as height, weight, etc. This information, photo, and print also goes into a national database that isn't connected to law enforcement or any government agency. It is never accessed without parental consent, and the records are only maintained for a year.
It's as harmless as using a chicken egg to determine the sex of an unborn child, and just as useful.

INRM
28th February 2010, 02:25 PM
This sounds like a bunch of fear-mongering; I can't see anything good coming out of this

TsarBomba
28th February 2010, 02:41 PM
Many police departments in North America offer free fingerprinting kits for parents. The kits are simple, you ink your kid's hands, press the fingers to the card-stock, and then you keep a set of your kid's prints in a drawer somewhere in your house. You can also get a free kit from the Polly Klass foundation (http://freebies.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=freebies&cdn=hobbies&tm=6&f=00&tt=11&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//www.pollyklaas.org/), which also has an easy means of taking and keeping a sample of your child's DNA.

Of course, the real purpose of these kits is so that if a child goes missing and a body is later found, the parents can give the prints or DNA to law enforcement so that they can potentially identify the body.

There is no reason that you can't just do this yourself and keep all of the information at home.

TjW
28th February 2010, 04:13 PM
Also this accusation from a parent in Idaho that:

Ident-A-Kid is not an organization with a legitimate board of directors. It sells franchises to privateers. The "agent" obtaining the child’s information does not have the proper credentials lawfully authorizing them to obtain fingerprints. (bolding by TjW

She also goes on to say that Ident-A-Kid retains owership of the personal information obtain from the children.

http://proliberty.com/observer/20070619.htm

While I'm not advocating for Ident-A-Kid -- as others have pointed out, there are cheaper ways to get a copy of your kid's prints -- the part in the quote that I bolded seems like an odd thing to say. This is a service they're providing It's not as though they're hauling them in for questioning. I'm betting they won't make the fingerprint unless you pay them money. Other than the parent's authorization, why should they need anything else?

Around here, the cheap way to get them, should you so desire, is a free Kid Safety Day in the parking lot at a local amusement park. The local police make up an ID with the picture and prints that sounds very much like the Ident-A-Kid product. I don't know if they keep anything on file. The police and fire departments are there giving safety presentations and handing out other freebies like t-shirts and fireman hats as well.

Skeptical Greg
28th February 2010, 04:28 PM
I have heard it said that fingerprinting kids is of little use, other than helping identify dead bodies ...

I would like to hear of just one scenario where a kids fingerprints were actually used in any meaningful way..

" Hey lady, we have this kid and he may be yours "

" Did you check his fingerprints, so we can be sure ? "

TsarBomba
28th February 2010, 04:47 PM
I have heard it said that fingerprinting kids is of little use, other than helping identify dead bodies ...

I would like to hear of just one scenario where a kids fingerprints were actually used in any meaningful way..


I think you just fulfilled our own request for such a scenario. Identifying dead bodies is not trivial, especially for a family needing to know what happened to their child.

Skeptical Greg
28th February 2010, 04:59 PM
Your earlier post drove this home ..

I should have been more specific by saying ' useful in recovering live children '..

I don't think these ' Ident-A-Kid ' people are parlaying the obvious ..

DevilsAdvocate
28th February 2010, 09:32 PM
I was just looking at my Kindergartner's weekly schedule for next week,
and for March 4th, there is written "Ident-A-Kid". I did a google search, and
it turned up a site for a company that fingerprints kids. (I haven't posted
enough here to put URLs in my posts yet, so please google it if you're
unfamiliar)

I'm a little weary about having my 5 year old fingerprinted. Does anyone
have any knowledge about this company? Would anyone else reading this be
a little weary?I had my prints taken when I was a kid in the 1970s. It was part of a child safety program offered by the Jaycees or Boy Scouts or something like that.
I remember having difficulty learning to relax my hands so that they could roll my fingers and get good prints. They took a full set of prints. I don’t remember if my parents got any cards.

Many years later I had to be fingerprinted for a security clearance. A couple of FBI guys were doing the fingerprinting, and the FBI guy noticed that I knew how to relax my hand and let my finger roll. He said something like, “You’re pretty good at this. You must have done a fair amount of jail time.” I explained that I had never been arrested, but had my prints taken as a kid for the child protection in case I was abducted or anything. The two FBI guys looked up at each other a laughed and said, “Like that would do a lot of good! Har har har.” I guess they were laughing because fingerprints would only really be useful to identify a body (and probably only needed if the face was unrecognizable).

The Ident-A-Kid site says it was started 21-23 years ago by a mother who was separated from her child in a shopping mall. The only success story they have on the site is a parent who was separated from a child at a baseball game where they were able to put the kid’s picture up on the big board and the kid was found leaving the park with a strange man.

In either case, it seems simply having a picture of your children would serve the same purpose. However, it would be nice to have laminated ID cards, especially if you don’t otherwise carry pictures in a wallet, purse, or cell phone.

It looks like Ident-A-Kid has been around a long time and the card services have been used by many schools, police departments, and even the navy. I could not find anything on Better Business Bureau or even any complaints (other than one about advertising franchises in an area without the proper license, and one about a school signing a permission slip for a parent who didn’t want the kid fingerprinted). So it seems safe.

It looks like the cost is about $6-$15 for 1 to 4 cards, although the costs is sometimes covered by the city, PTA, or other organizations. Cards can include emergency contact information and other information like allergies. You can give a copy of a card to a neighbor, babysitter, or other person that might have the care of your child that might not otherwise have a picture and other information immediately available.

It all sounds reasonable to me. Of course if you are worried a company doing this, you can use a home kit from Ident-A-Kid or some other company.

Cactus Wren
28th February 2010, 10:18 PM
Also this accusation from a parent in Idaho that:



She also goes on to say that Ident-A-Kid retains owership of the personal information obtain from the children.

http://proliberty.com/observer/20070619.htm

I always like to check sources.

http://proliberty.com/observer/

This paper's "front page news" items for February 2010 include:

Obama takes giant leap to eliminate state sovereignty (http://proliberty.com/observer/20100201.html)
Ron Paul says "take out the CIA!" while NSA goes to bed with Google (http://proliberty.com/observer/20100202.html)
In Memory of Legendary Historian Eustace Mullins (http://proliberty.com/observer/20100203.html) *
Israeli mind-scanner may take over US airports (http://proliberty.com/observer/20100204.html)

* Wikipedia article on Eustace Mullins (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eustace_Mullins)

DevilsAdvocate
1st March 2010, 12:43 AM
I always like to check sources.

http://proliberty.com/observer/
Yeah. That is one of the cases I cited. Based on the nature of the article, I didn’t give it much credence.

Also note that the claim that “Ident-A-Kid retains ownership of the personal information obtain from the children” is not true. The quote from the article is:

On further inspection of the website (www.ident-a-kid.com), it goes on to say that the company (ISA) "is the owner of the information collected on the site and reserves the right to access and disclose individually identifiable information to comply with government requests…"

The Ident-A-Kid website makes it clear that this is in reference to information collected on the website, not information collected about kids in the process of making ID cards. In respect to making the ID cards, Ident-A-Kid states:

Ident-A-Kid representatives collect personal information (photo, fingerprint, physical description, name, and address) from children (via their parents or guardian name) for the purpose of producing child identification cards for their parents or guardians. Personal information is only collected from children with signed consent of the parent or guardian. This information is not sold, rented or shared in any way and is deleted from the representative’s database within 60 days of finished ID cards being returned to the parent or guardian.

I don’t see any problem with this. I don’t see any indication at all that they have ever violated this privacy policy. So, I don’t see any problem.

Snoogens
1st March 2010, 09:00 AM
If done right, it could be an interesting experience for a kid. I remember my gradeschool doing a fingerprint/picture event in for pre-schoolers (i was 4 or 5) but it was coordinated with the local police department. It was really cool to do the finger prints and talk to the police officers. My parents have a copy of the fingerprint card somewhere, which is kind of neat when I compare my hands then and now, and I learned a lot about safety.

dropzone
3rd March 2010, 08:43 PM
I always found it creepy, as it's most useful when your child's (fresh) body is found or if he is recovered alive from some creep's home many years on. The odds of either situation occurring is vanishingly small, and I spend too much of my life tracking them.

I am a researcher for a writer on forensic anthropology and I find the whole thing almost totally useless and scaremongering.

ETA: I did not do it with any of my children, and I didn't bother exploring what a sleazy, exploitive organization Ident-A-Kid is. However, I'm annoyed that local school districts used them. Not mine, as I warned people how they didn't want the Feds to have their fingerprints...

...No, that didn't happen. They blew it off as soon as they learned the school district would have to pay for it.

Sometimes it's best to let Republicans work things out on their own. ;)