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commandlinegamer
5th May 2010, 02:34 PM
A quick and dirty poll to see what the voting intentions are of the posters here. No names necessary; we already know where you live. And remember the golden rule: vote early, and vote often.

Professor Yaffle
5th May 2010, 02:41 PM
...waits for poll to appear.

andyandy
5th May 2010, 02:45 PM
I protest the lack of poll options :)

I'm going to vote Lib dem.

My reasons:

I think the best possible way of achieving electoral reform is by having the lib dems with as big a share of the votes as possible - to create something of a moral pressure for reform. In my own constituency it's a straight fight between lab-con - neither of which i can possibly bring myself to vote for. I was previously planning to vote Green, because their policies most closely match my own ideas. But taking a long term view, i see a vote for the lib dems as the best chance of allowing a greater left wing voice in politics in the future....

Debaser
5th May 2010, 02:45 PM
You know, when you lay out all our choices like that...



...somebody wake me up in five years time, I'm off to bed for a little while.

commandlinegamer
5th May 2010, 02:50 PM
I forgot to add option 21 - Monster Raving Loony.

Rolfe
5th May 2010, 02:53 PM
I feel I ought to snapshot this while it lasts.... SNP ahead!

Rolfe.

GlennB
5th May 2010, 03:00 PM
I protest the implicit inclusion of "Miss Whiplash" under "other".

Debaser
5th May 2010, 03:17 PM
Oh for the days of Natural Law and their yogic 'flying' (it was bouncing FFS, everyone could see it you fools).

Architect
5th May 2010, 03:32 PM
SNP/Lib pact, here we come!

Rolfe
5th May 2010, 03:59 PM
Nah, the LibDems'll never agree to a coalition.... :D

Rolfe.

Debaser
5th May 2010, 04:08 PM
Sorry Gordon, but to be talking about reforming the House of Lords 13 years after you started the process?

And not content with England simply being a land of 'regions' rather than a nation, you would further divide us into 'city-regions', presumably to compete with each other for the crumbs that fall from London's table, rather than co-operate and try to bring prosperity to a whole country.

No Gordon, this time at least, it's the public schoolboy out of The Peoples Republic of Sheffield...Cleggover and his hopefully liberal Liberals.

Evilgiraffe
5th May 2010, 10:51 PM
Awesome. Lib-Dem with 47% of the vote (as of this post). Landslide win for Nick Clegg! :D

uk_dave
5th May 2010, 11:45 PM
Odd, I seem to recall seeing one regular JREF poster state categorically on another thread that the JREF forum has a far left bias.... c'mon commies, get voting!

Professor Yaffle
6th May 2010, 12:14 AM
By US standards, the Lib Dems ARE far left.

DC
6th May 2010, 12:27 AM
damn i voted green and now i only realise this is for Brits only.
i vote for a new queen :D

Architect
6th May 2010, 12:28 AM
By US standards, the Lib Dems ARE far left.


By US standards, the Conservative Party is far, far left

Aitch
6th May 2010, 12:31 AM
Awesome. Lib-Dem with 47% of the vote (as of this post). Landslide win for Nick Clegg! :D

The problem is that the way the boundaries are rigged, the LibDems could get 80% of the vote and still only have a couple of dozen seats. :(

Professor Yaffle
6th May 2010, 01:12 AM
Do you think they will insist on electoral reform as a condition of joining up with another Party in a hung parliament?

Dave Rogers
6th May 2010, 02:39 AM
And remember the golden rule: vote early, and vote often.

8:25am, and I voted twice.

Dave

Dave Rogers
6th May 2010, 02:40 AM
Do you think they will insist on electoral reform as a condition of joining up with another Party in a hung parliament?

Is the Pope a paedophile Catholic?

Dave

funk de fino
6th May 2010, 03:07 AM
Do you think they will insist on electoral reform as a condition of joining up with another Party in a hung parliament?

Yes, and I am sure Labour would give them most on this. Not so sure about the Tories though.

Rolfe
6th May 2010, 04:53 AM
By US standards, the Lib Dems ARE far left.


By US standards, the Conservative Party is far, far left


So what does that make the SNP? Communist?

Rolfe.

MarkCorrigan
6th May 2010, 04:57 AM
So what does that make the SNP? Communist?

Rolfe.

We're ALL communists.

Duh, don't you know anything about British politics? :D

Rolfe
6th May 2010, 05:29 AM
You're right. I forgot. And the Swiss are slaves....

:dl:

Rolfe.

jimbob
6th May 2010, 03:39 PM
By US standards, the Lib Dems ARE far left.

Also, Labour isn't really. They bought into a lot of the Tory ideas

Architect
7th May 2010, 12:53 AM
Jings, how innacurate was our poll or what....

funk de fino
7th May 2010, 01:16 AM
Jings, how innacurate was our poll or what....

Oh, I dont know. 6 SNP votes here and 6 seats retained. Spooky.

zooterkin
8th May 2010, 01:18 AM
Jings, how innacurate was our poll or what....

I suspect it's possible we're not representative of the general population. ;)

I do remember the thought crossing my mind after the TV debates and the opinion polls that went with it that it was a shame if voting was going to be determined by the personality of the party leaders, and how well they were judged as doing in the debate would translate to votes for their parties. However, that was the way it was being presented, and I assumed (you'd think I'd have known better) that the media presenting it knew what they were talking about.

It's also may be worth discussing the way the result of the election is talked about as being something the electorate wanted, as if it was one body which decided consciously that an inconclusive result was what it wanted. (This is not a new phenomenon, it tends to be how things are talked about after any election.) I doubt very much as if any individual voter wanted what we have now, yet the politicians in particular seem to be trying to put blame on the voters for the situation.

Finally, there was some good news in the local elections. The BNP has lost all 12 seats it held in Barking and Dagenham. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/election_2010/england/8668885.stm)

Fiona
8th May 2010, 01:29 AM
It is interesting from that point of view and it is one bright spot in a dismal landscape. The media does not have as much power as it thinks it has and as I feared. Though the politicians seem to have been moving to a more presidential system and they seem to think that is a good idea it does not seem to have taken much. I hope they will scrap the idea: though I think they will not. But it is not impossible.

BNP result is encouraging as well :)

stilicho
8th May 2010, 01:46 AM
It is interesting from that point of view and it is one bright spot in a dismal landscape. The media does not have as much power as it thinks it has and as I feared. Though the politicians seem to have been moving to a more presidential system and they seem to think that is a good idea it does not seem to have taken much. I hope they will scrap the idea: though I think they will not. But it is not impossible.

BNP result is encouraging as well :)

I warned some Brit ex-pats here about this. Sinn Fein could mathematically balance the power.

Now what's with this "hung parliament"? We've typically had minority governments in Canada for extended periods of time. Why is this such a problem in the UK?

stilicho
8th May 2010, 01:51 AM
A quick and dirty poll to see what the voting intentions are of the posters here. No names necessary; we already know where you live. And remember the golden rule: vote early, and vote often.

This must be a "joke poll". There aren't even that many LibDems in all Britain, are there?

Don't they want to burn all the people who earn more than they do? Don't they want a cosier relationship with the EU and abandon the GBP in favour of the Greek insano-drachma euro?

zooterkin
8th May 2010, 02:07 AM
I warned some Brit ex-pats here about this. Sinn Fein could mathematically balance the power.



The Sinn Fein MPs don't take up their seats in the House as a matter of principle, so they don't really enter the equation, except by reducing the number of seats needed for an effective majority.

stilicho
8th May 2010, 04:02 AM
The Sinn Fein MPs don't take up their seats in the House as a matter of principle, so they don't really enter the equation, except by reducing the number of seats needed for an effective majority.

Our separatists hold their seats in Parliament as a matter of...

OK, actually, nobody really has ever understood how or why our separatists attend Parliament, but it probably has something to do with an eventual opportunity at achieving a deciding vote.

Are you one of the LibDems in the above vote? I take it the poll was responded to in jest by all. There really aren't any LibDems here, are there?

Evilgiraffe
8th May 2010, 04:09 AM
Um, yes. What's your problem with Lib-Dems?

Debaser
8th May 2010, 05:01 AM
Though the politicians seem to have been moving to a more presidential system and they seem to think that is a good idea it does not seem to have taken much. I hope they will scrap the idea: though I think they will not. But it is not impossible.

This is the problem we seem to have in the UK, we look to the US as a model for everything in our culture, good or bad. They are not the only nation to conduct such debates. According to the wikithing even parliamentary democracies conduct such debates. Who'd a thought it?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaders%27_debate#Participating_countries

I warned some Brit ex-pats here about this. Sinn Fein could mathematically balance the power.

Now what's with this "hung parliament"? We've typically had minority governments in Canada for extended periods of time. Why is this such a problem in the UK?

While they have to swear allegiance to the Queen/Britain, SF won't take their seats.

As for a minority government being a problem, it isn't, it's just we're not used to it (or to coalitions, sadly). This might finally get the UK parliament out of the C19th and into the C20th. :jaw-dropp


This must be a "joke poll". There aren't even that many LibDems in all Britain, are there?

Just a quarter of the electorate, so not many, no. Certainly billions, if not trillions less than the 37% that voted Tory and 30% that voted Labour. And they would have carried out a referendum before taking us into the Euro. Which would have meant no Euro.

jimbob
8th May 2010, 05:05 AM
Our separatists hold their seats in Parliament as a matter of...

OK, actually, nobody really has ever understood how or why our separatists attend Parliament, but it probably has something to do with an eventual opportunity at achieving a deciding vote.

Are you one of the LibDems in the above vote? I take it the poll was responded to in jest by all. There really aren't any LibDems here, are there?

The JREF is probably more liberal (small "l) than the general population. Lib Dem policies chime better with my values than either Tories or new Labour, both of which have authoritarian streaks.

Lothian
8th May 2010, 05:08 AM
Um, yes. What's your problem with Lib-Dems?I have no problem with them. They would probably be my party of choice. However the Lib Dem candidate in Durham ran an exceedingly negative campaign. I received copious amounts of literature from her. 90% contained criticisms of the Labour party, Gordon Brown and the sitting MP.

By contrast the Labour MP's campaign simply listed the positive things that she and Labour had done for the area. She did not mention the Lib Dems once.

The contrast was really stark. I put aside my national preference and voted against the Lib Dem candidate's negative campaign strategy.

City of Durham was expected to go Lib Dem. I heard that, privately, the Labour MP was expecting to be defeated. The profile differs here from the North East generally. Lib dems dominate the City council wards. I know a lot of people who, like me, voted on the basis of the campaign rather than the policies.

I understand that the Lib Dem candidate's losing speech was equally ungracious, confirming that I made the right choice. I am considering sending all the material received to the Lib Dem head office so they can see exactly why this winnable seat was lost.

One other bad thing about the local campaign, I have realised is national. "Liberal Democrats Winning Here" signs everywhere. I think it tells the Lib Dem supporters they don't need to vote, it is in the bag, and gives the opposite message to the other parties. Crazy.

Delscottio
8th May 2010, 05:14 AM
I have no problem with them. They would probably be my party of choice. However the Lib Dem candidate in Durham ran an exceedingly negative campaign. I received copious amounts of literature from her. 90% contained criticisms of the Labour party, Gordon Brown and the sitting MP.

By contrast the Labour MP's campaign simply listed the positive things that she and Labour had done for the area. She did not mention the Lib Dems once.

The contrast was really stark. I put aside my national preference and voted against the Lib Dem candidate's negative campaign strategy.

City of Durham was expected to go Lib Dem. I heard that, privately, the Labour MP was expecting to be defeated. The profile differs here from the North East generally. Lib dems dominate the City council wards. I know a lot of people who, like me, voted on the basis of the campaign rather than the policies.

I understand that the Lib Dem candidate's losing speech was equally ungracious, confirming that I made the right choice. I am considering sending all the material received to the Lib Dem head office so they can see exactly why this winnable seat was lost.

One other bad thing about the local campaign, I have realised is national. "Liberal Democrats Winning Here" signs everywhere. I think it tells the Lib Dem supporters they don't need to vote, it is in the bag, and gives the opposite message to the other parties. Crazy.

The Lib Dems ran something similar here (North Tyneside) not the winning boards like. However the biggest reason I couldn't vote for them was the amount of spelling mistakes and grammatical errors in their local flyers. It was shocking and doesn't endear confidence if they couldn't be arsed to employ a proof reader.


I accept now I've written that that I will have made a load of said errors in my post, however I ain't running for office ;)

MarkCorrigan
8th May 2010, 07:02 AM
Our separatists hold their seats in Parliament as a matter of...

OK, actually, nobody really has ever understood how or why our separatists attend Parliament, but it probably has something to do with an eventual opportunity at achieving a deciding vote.

Are you one of the LibDems in the above vote? I take it the poll was responded to in jest by all. There really aren't any LibDems here, are there?

I'm a paid up member. Got a problem with that?

zooterkin
8th May 2010, 10:03 AM
Are you one of the LibDems in the above vote? I take it the poll was responded to in jest by all. There really aren't any LibDems here, are there?

Just as a matter of curiosity, what do you think the LibDems stand for?