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NWO Sentryman
4th August 2010, 12:35 PM
Okay, here is a repository of really cool latin phrases.

Oderint Dum Metuant: Let them hate so long as they fear.

Ques custodiet ipsos custodes: who watches the watchers?

timhau
4th August 2010, 12:39 PM
Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit. -- A wise man does not pee against the wind.

DallasDad
4th August 2010, 12:40 PM
Dum spiro, spero -- while I breathe, I hope.

Floyt
4th August 2010, 12:54 PM
Utinam fulcrum te defaecationem adiemit! - May you be hit by lightning while taking a dump!

Not too sure about the verb tense (should be optative), it's been a while...


Delirant isti Romani! - Obelix

Aepervius
4th August 2010, 01:00 PM
If kitchen latin count, read my sig.

otherwise , Errare Humanum est.

ddt
4th August 2010, 01:06 PM
Errare humanum est - to err is human
Homo homini lupus - (one) man is a wolf to (another) man

I learnt my first Latin phrases reading Asterix comics. :)

WanderingSkeptic
4th August 2010, 01:08 PM
I've always liked ...
Audio, video, disco. - I hear, I see, I learn

Simply because the Latin means something else in our times. I just love the idea of some english public school having that as its motto.

On a more serious note ... how about ...
- Aut vincere aut mori. - Either conquer or die.

But then there are also the ones we all know ...
- Carpe diem. - Seize the day. (literally "pluck” the day)
- Caveat emptor. - Let the buyer beware.

However, for anybody abut to start reading their bible, how about
- Caveat lector. - Let the reader beware.

Then, for those who dare to post in some controversial JREF threads, we have
- Morituri te salutant. - Those who are about to die salute you.

NWO Sentryman
4th August 2010, 01:10 PM
for the administratum, Oderint Dum Metuant would be a cool custom title.

Snd would be a pretty cool school motto.

Anerystos
4th August 2010, 01:12 PM
The motto of the school I went to: Fiat Lux - "Let there be light". Pity it didn't live up to that ideal.

How many of you guys can identify it?

Anerystos
4th August 2010, 01:17 PM
I do like the bastard Latin, though:

"Illegitimi non carborundum" (or variants thereof - eg "The Handmaid's Tale")

"Don't let the bastards grind you down".

cwalner
4th August 2010, 01:26 PM
A friend from college had a T-shirt that read 'Vidi, Vinci, Vini'

ddt
4th August 2010, 01:42 PM
Snd would be a pretty cool school motto.

Non scolae, sed vitae discimus - we don't learn for the school, but for life.

ddt
4th August 2010, 01:46 PM
And particularly apt for all the woo-ists around:

Mundus vult decipi - the world wants to be deceived.

Little 10 Toes
4th August 2010, 02:06 PM
Vescere bracis meis.

Eat my shorts.

LibraryLady
4th August 2010, 02:16 PM
De gustibus non est disputandum.

There is no disputing about taste. A teacher of mind used to add, "As the old lady said as she kissed the cow."

aofl
4th August 2010, 02:17 PM
Romanes eunt domus: People called Romanes, they go, the house

A

Piscivore
4th August 2010, 02:57 PM
Carpe Pesca.

I've probably got it wrong, but: praeibo peccabo

Floyt
4th August 2010, 03:08 PM
Cave piscem inflatibus? :D

jhunter1163
4th August 2010, 03:11 PM
Crampe Diem - Seize the Midol

Piscivore
4th August 2010, 03:14 PM
Cave piscem inflatibus? :D

:D

Sigged.

Chaos
4th August 2010, 03:19 PM
How about "Repensum est cunicula" - "Payback is a bitch"?

WanderingSkeptic
4th August 2010, 03:29 PM
OK ... try this one ... Horace in his Sermons 1.2 and 1.3 says ....

"Nam fuit ante Helenam cunnus taeterrima belli causa ..."

In our culture its popular to think of Helen of Troy as the face that launched a thousand ships, however, here Horace is saying something quite different ... here he is saying indirectly that the cause of the Trojan war was not a face at all, but rather was caused by a rather different piece of her anatomy ... in this case I'll leave it up to you to translate the latin word cunnus ... I suspect you can guess. :D

NWO Sentryman
4th August 2010, 03:33 PM
canis canem edit - dog eat dog.

jsfisher
4th August 2010, 03:41 PM
Ursa sinisterum, rana dextrous.


Bear left, right frog.

steve s
4th August 2010, 03:42 PM
Semper ubi sub ubi-- Okay, somebody had to say it. And yes I know it doesn't really mean what it's supposed to.

Nos morituri te salutamus-- We about to die salute you. Supposedly said by Roman gladiators just before their fights.

ETA: Almost forgot Imbibo Ergo Sum, a favorite from my college days. :)

Steve S

ddt
4th August 2010, 04:02 PM
Suum cuique - To each his own.

Normally this saying has a positive connotation. It has, however, also been used by the Nazis in its German translation ("Jedem das Seine") as the quote above the gate of Buchenwald).

saraban
4th August 2010, 04:40 PM
Qui Cumundrun

Gord_in_Toronto
4th August 2010, 04:52 PM
"Discipulae spectate. Ubi est Brittania. Ubi est Gallia." The first line of my Grade 8 Latin text and just about the only words I remember. :o It's why I'm not judge. :(

dasmiller
4th August 2010, 05:01 PM
Ars longa, vita brevis

The short translation is something like "Art is long, life is short" but as I understand it, "ars" is better translated as "mastery of a craft," so a more accurate translation would be "mastery takes a long time, life is short," which isn't very pithy. Which is why I prefer the latin. Plus it just sounds classier in latin.

Also, from "Bored of the Rings" - Cogito Ergo Boggum

lionking
4th August 2010, 05:02 PM
Romanes eunt domus

Or is it, Romani ite domum?

Gratuitious Monty Python reference. Sorry.

dasmiller
4th August 2010, 05:07 PM
Romanes eunt domus

Truly apropos, but aofl beat you to it.

lionking
4th August 2010, 05:08 PM
Truly apropos, but aofl beat you to it.
Bugger, missed it, sorry.

MikeMangum
4th August 2010, 05:14 PM
Si vis pacem, para bellum

Doctor Evil
4th August 2010, 05:27 PM
My signature has one ...

Fnord
4th August 2010, 05:32 PM
My signature has another ...

"Ex Quesitia, Scientia"
("From Examination, Knowledge")

theprestige
4th August 2010, 05:42 PM
Cave canem -- "beware of dog".

Zep
4th August 2010, 05:45 PM
A few common ones out of the way for those who have seen them but were not aware what they really were:

Quid pro quo - this for that, a deal, mutual backscratching
Status quo (ante bellum) - the state of things (before the war)
ipso facto - by the fact itself, therefore
et al(ia) - among others
QED (quod erat demonstrandum) - that which is to be demonstrated

ddt
4th August 2010, 06:19 PM
And a couple of Caesar's of course:

Alea iacta est - the die is cast
veni, vidi, vici - I came, I saw, I conquered

Doctor Evil
4th August 2010, 06:22 PM
And a couple of Caesar's of course:

Alea iacta est - the die is cast

I vaguely remember reading somewhere that the Caesar used Greek rather than Latin, and the phrase was taken from some Greek play.

anor277
4th August 2010, 06:27 PM
Ars longa, vita brevis

The short translation is something like "Art is long, life is short" but as I understand it, "ars" is better translated as "mastery of a craft," so a more accurate translation would be "mastery takes a long time, life is short," which isn't very pithy. Which is why I prefer the latin. Plus it just sounds classier in latin.
............

And all the while I thought that "Ars longa, vita brevis" meant "you'll have a short life if you have a big arse".

bruto
4th August 2010, 07:09 PM
A favorite from PA Insurance commissioner Herbert Denenberg back in the 70's:

Populus iamdudum defutatus est, The public have been screwed long enough.

Mus non fidit una antro, the mouse doesn't put his trust in one hole, other English version, the mouse that hath but one hole is quickly taken.

A horribly prolix bit of medieval Latin, but the message is pretty good:

Parisios Stolidum si quis transmittat asellum - Si hic est asinus non erit illic equus. Roughly = you can send an ass to university but he won't come back a horse. This from a Peter Breughel engraving of "the Ass in School."

One from Tacitus that could easily applied to some we encounter here:

Fingunt simul creduntque. They make it up and believe it at the same time.

e.t.a and we mustn't leave out the motto of The Addams Family (movie version): Sic gorgiamus allos subjectatus nunc, We feast on those who would subject us. I suspect the Latin would not stand up well to scholarly scrutiny, but.....

ddt
4th August 2010, 07:13 PM
I vaguely remember reading somewhere that the Caesar used Greek rather than Latin, and the phrase was taken from some Greek play.

Wiki (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alea_iacta_est) says you're right. Thanks. I would have thought it were from his own writings.

ETA: another one:
Artis natura magister - Nature is the master of art
The name of the Amsterdam zoo, of course in daily use, it's shortened to just Artis.

Fnord
4th August 2010, 07:32 PM
Mos publicus est sepius inconcessus per sentio

(The will of the people is often prohibited by judges)

Prop 8 supporters know this all too well.

Madalch
4th August 2010, 07:51 PM
The motto of the school I went to: Fiat Lux - "Let there be light". Pity it didn't live up to that ideal.

How many of you guys can identify it?
University of Lethbridge?

Gord_in_Toronto
4th August 2010, 07:54 PM
Oh. And.

Per Ardua ad Astra.

Delvo
4th August 2010, 08:08 PM
A friend from college had a T-shirt that read 'Vidi, Vinci, Vini'I saw, I conquered, I drank wine?

I sometimes use "Veni, vidi, vamosi" as a joke, the last word having been borrowed from Spanish to pretend to say "I came, I saw, I left".

But a completely serious one: "Quidquid in lingua mortua dictum sit, cum mortis dictum est"... anything said in a dead language is only said to the dead. (In other words, knowing what that means is pointless!)

bruto
4th August 2010, 09:00 PM
For a long time my VW bus sported a bumper sticker that said Festina Lente. It's usually rendered as "make haste slowly," but festina can also mean "accelerate," which pretty well nailed it.

HistoryGal
4th August 2010, 10:01 PM
My hero, Stan Freberg, took MGM's motto of "Ars Gratia Artis" and changed it to "Ars Gratia Pecuniae" for his company "Freberg, Ltd. (but not very)."

His company's seal was a picture of a seal drawn by Saul Bass. The seal wears a pendent with a small bass on it.

timhau
4th August 2010, 10:15 PM
My hero, Stan Freberg, took MGM's motto of "Ars Gratia Artis" and changed it to "Ars Gratia Pecuniae"

That's a better motto. Pecunia non olet.

Fonebone
4th August 2010, 10:43 PM
And particularly apt for all the woo-ists around:

Mundus vult decipi - the world wants to be deceived.

Here is something particularly apt for all of the boil-suckers
around:
Veritas nihil veretur nisi abscondi
Truth is afraid of nothing but concealment

Cactus Wren
4th August 2010, 10:55 PM
Stercus stercus stercus moriturus sum.

Ysidro
5th August 2010, 03:04 AM
I've been trying to translate The Operator's Prayer. "Oh God, not on my shift." The problem is finding the best way of saying shift as in "period of time in which I am required to work."

Think_Tank
5th August 2010, 05:02 AM
A friend of my Dad had a saying in pseudo-Latin:

Semper in excretum solus depthus variat - Always in the :rule10. Only the depth varies.

Anyone know what the actual Latin phrase should be?

BaaBaa
5th August 2010, 05:28 AM
Conspiraloon motto: "Post hoc, ergo propter hoc"

Fnord
5th August 2010, 06:59 AM
A friend of my Dad had a saying in pseudo-Latin: Semper in excretum solus depthus variat - Always in the :rule10. Only the depth varies. Anyone know what the actual Latin phrase should be?
Usquequaque In Fimus. Tantum Vis Varius.

(Always in manure. Only the quantity varies.)

jiggeryqua
5th August 2010, 07:58 AM
Many years ago I GMd a PBM game called:

Delenda est Carthago

Carthage must be destroyed. Not a lot of use as an every day phrase, I grant you, but it stuck with me.

Vortigern99
5th August 2010, 08:08 AM
I vaguely remember reading somewhere that the Caesar used Greek rather than Latin, and the phrase was taken from some Greek play.

Your sources are mistaken. Caesar spoke and wrote in Latin. I've translated part of his Gallic Wars from the original Latin into English. Why would a Roman citizen in command of thousands of Latin-speaking Romans speak Greek? They wouldn't follow a word he was saying.

ETA: Ah, I see by ddt's post #42 that Caesar spoke that one phrase in Greek, not that he spoke Greek all the time. Point clarified!

ETA: Once, in high school I wandered into my old Latin class to say hello to my former classmates. I looked over one student's shoulder at the textbook they were translating and I said: "It's all Greek to me." The professor became very impatient and told me to leave, but I thought it was my wittiest moment ever.

ddt
5th August 2010, 08:23 AM
Carthage must be destroyed. Not a lot of use as an every day phrase, I grant you, but it stuck with me.
In its entirety: "ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam" - for the rest, I think that Carthage must be destroyed.

ddt
5th August 2010, 08:26 AM
ETA: Once, in high school I wandered into my old Latin class to say hello to my former classmates. I looked over one student's shoulder at the textbook they were translating and I said: "It's all Greek to me." The professor became very impatient and told me to leave, but I thought it was my wittiest moment ever.
A bit of a loose association:

Timeo Danaos et donas ferentes! (Fear the Greeks even when they're bearing gifts)

stup_id
5th August 2010, 10:52 AM
"Sic amicus Plato, magis amicus veritas"

I'm friend of Plato, more friend of truth...

This is allegedly the phrase Aristotle uttered when asked about something that contradicted his teacher's philosophy. For skeptics I think is invaluable, always side with the truth even when it contradicts your closest friends

Piscivore
5th August 2010, 11:17 AM
I've been trying to translate The Operator's Prayer. "Oh God, not on my shift." The problem is finding the best way of saying shift as in "period of time in which I am required to work."

"obligatus (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/obligatus)"?

Piscivore
5th August 2010, 11:19 AM
For a long time my VW bus sported a bumper sticker that said Festina Lente. It's usually rendered as "make haste slowly," but festina can also mean "accelerate," which pretty well nailed it.

I'm so stealing that.

Ravenwood
5th August 2010, 11:45 AM
The two I remember from High School Latin are #1) Our School's motto "Virliter Age"-"Act Manfully" & #2) "Vivere commune est, sed non commune mereri."-"everone lives, not everyone deserves to."

dudalb
5th August 2010, 02:46 PM
I always loved the Latin Graffti they showed in the miniseries "Rome". It's based on actual ROman graffiti, and graffiti does not really change much.
My favorite was what somebody scrawled on the wall of Atia's(the mother of Augustus) villa..."Atia Felat Omnes"

which means "Atia will **** anybody".

I am also rereading Colleen McCullough's "Masters of Rome" series of novels. (The First is "The First Man In Rome')
Great read, and very accurate as to detail. The books include a good size glossery explaining the Latin terms used in the books, particularly as they relate to politics.

bruto
5th August 2010, 02:53 PM
Many years ago I GMd a PBM game called:



Carthage must be destroyed. Not a lot of use as an every day phrase, I grant you, but it stuck with me.

I always thought that meant "Carthage is destroyed," with a word carefully chosen to mean just what you'd expect the root verb for "delete" to mean.

Delvo
5th August 2010, 07:38 PM
"Est" does mean "is", but "delenda" doesn't mean "destroyed". It's a verb in a form that English doesn't have, which indicates that the subject should, or needs to, have that root verb's meaning done to it. To translate that word alone, English would need to use a phrase like "required to be destroyed" or "in need of destruction". But when translating a whole sentence which uses that verb form, we can get smoother English results by replacing "is" with "must be", moving the sense of need or imperativeness where English would naturally put it, in the main verb instead of in the description that the verb leads to.

In the longer version, "also, I believe that Carthage must be destroyed" (which the speaker in question would add to the end of every speech for a while no matter what the rest of the speech had been about), the whole bit about Carthage and its need for destruction is contained within the statement of "also, I believe ___"... which makes it a clause instead of a whole sentence by itself, which makes a difference in what suffixes you use in Latin, which is why the two versions' equivalent words end with a few different letters.

bruto
5th August 2010, 08:52 PM
"Est" does mean "is", but "delenda" doesn't mean "destroyed". It's a verb in a form that English doesn't have, which indicates that the subject should, or needs to, have that root verb's meaning done to it. To translate that word alone, English would need to use a phrase like "required to be destroyed" or "in need of destruction". But when translating a whole sentence which uses that verb form, we can get smoother English results by replacing "is" with "must be", moving the sense of need or imperativeness where English would naturally put it, in the main verb instead of in the description that the verb leads to.

In the longer version, "also, I believe that Carthage must be destroyed" (which the speaker in question would add to the end of every speech for a while no matter what the rest of the speech had been about), the whole bit about Carthage and its need for destruction is contained within the statement of "also, I believe ___"... which makes it a clause instead of a whole sentence by itself, which makes a difference in what suffixes you use in Latin, which is why the two versions' equivalent words end with a few different letters.Interesting. I never gave it that much thought, but will consider my previous misreading corrected. So, basically, it's "Carthage should be annihilated."

fuelair
5th August 2010, 10:05 PM
I saw, I conquered, I drank wine?

I sometimes use "Veni, vidi, vamosi" as a joke, the last word having been borrowed from Spanish to pretend to say "I came, I saw, I left".

But a completely serious one: "Quidquid in lingua mortua dictum sit, cum mortis dictum est"... anything said in a dead language is only said to the dead. (In other words, knowing what that means is pointless!)

The Latin for your VVV is Veni, Vidi, Fugi - I came, I saw, I fled!!:D

fuelair
5th August 2010, 10:22 PM
And further: Quid, me vexari? What, me worry? (Mad Magazine for the non US or non-silly humor - though it was much better in the beginning when Kurtzman and such were working for it and Gaines was still with us.)
Carpe noctem!! Sieze the night!! and, purely informational, vagina = scabbard .....a violent lot indeed!!
In hoc signo vinces!! In this sign we conquer! the sign here was, I fear, a cross.

Although, a joke translation (purported schoolboy error) exists also: Owing a lot, Signo is troubled. (literal: In hock, Signo winces!).

Another example of that sb type is Caesar's "Gallia est omnis divisa in partes tres." "All Gaul is divided into three parts" but mistranslated as "All Gaul is quartered into three halves." supposedly.

Madalch
5th August 2010, 10:49 PM
Quaecumque Vera. Whatsoever things are true.

shadron
5th August 2010, 11:23 PM
********, ********, ********.

History of the World, Part II.

NWO Sentryman
6th August 2010, 01:40 AM
cadavera vero innumera - truly countless bodies.

Mojo
6th August 2010, 01:54 AM
Nullius in verba.

zooterkin
6th August 2010, 04:40 AM
Peccavi












Supposedly the one-word telegram sent by General Charles Napier after he had captured Sindh; peccavi meaning "I have sinned" (I believe it's part of the Latin confession). It works as a pun ("I have Sindh") and also as an admission of wrongdoing, since he was supposed to only put down a rebellion, not conquer the territory.

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 04:48 AM
A friend from college had a T-shirt that read 'Vidi, Vinci, Vini'

Speaking of which, the phrase "Veni, vidi, vici" sounds really lame in the original Latin pronunciation.

Think_Tank
6th August 2010, 04:49 AM
Usquequaque In Fimus. Tantum Vis Varius.

(Always in manure. Only the quantity varies.)

Many thanks :D

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 04:50 AM
I wrote a composition years ago with the dedication line: Dicat ars fortius quam verba.

zooterkin
6th August 2010, 04:52 AM
Speaking of which, the phrase "Veni, vidi, vici" sounds really lame in the original Latin pronunciation.

Weeny, weedy, weaky?

Ethan Thane Athen
6th August 2010, 04:54 AM
...
On a more serious note ... how about ...
- Aut vincere aut mori. - Either conquer or die.

....

I obviously approve of that one as it's very close to my (genuine) clan motto:

Vincere Vel Mori - Victory or Death!


We're a very small clan......

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 04:56 AM
"Est" does mean "is",

I've always been intrigued by the play on words in the Nicene Creed where it says:

"passus et sepultus est" (He suffered and was buried),

which is short for

"passus est, et sepultus est"

Even though the word "est" has a completely different meaning in the first phrase, it is used once to refer to both phrases. "passus est" is one of those weird Latin phrases that is in active form but passive case. Without the special syntactic rules it means "he was suffered" but idiomatically it means "he suffered".

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 04:57 AM
Weeny, weedy, weaky?

Something like that. Even if spoken slowly with dramatic pauses, it sounds like something Elmer Fudd would say.

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 05:00 AM
I took two grueling semesters of self-paced Latin (a five credit-hour course!) before I learned that the university considered it a humanities class, not a foreign language, and it therefore didn't count towards my degree.

I never got that degree...

:(

Mojo
6th August 2010, 05:02 AM
Weeny, weedy, weaky?


"The Britons, however, who of course still used the old pronunciation, understood him to have called them "Weeny, Weedy and Weaky," lost heart and gave up the struggle, thinking that he had already divided them All into Three Parts." - Sellar & Yeatman, 1066 and All That.

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 05:10 AM
"The Britons, however, who of course still used the old pronunciation, understood him to have called them "Weeny, Weedy and Weaky," lost heart and gave up the struggle, thinking that he had already divided them All into Three Parts." - Sellar & Yeatman, 1066 and All That.

The Britons? The same ones who pronounce "Regina" so that it rhymes with "vagina"?

;)

Mojo
6th August 2010, 05:19 AM
The Britons? The same ones who pronounce "Regina" so that it rhymes with "vagina"?


The Ancient Britons, who according to the same source "had already made great strides in civilization, e.g. they buried each other in long round wheelbarrows (agriculture) and burnt each other alive (religion)".

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 06:22 AM
"they buried each other in long round wheelbarrows (agriculture) ".

Interesting...were they trying to grow Britons, or wheelbarrows?

TSR
6th August 2010, 06:31 AM
I never got that degree...

.
I've got a spare one I'll lease to you....
.

excaza
6th August 2010, 07:10 AM
Meo in somnio bellissima fuisti. Cum somno solutus sum bellissima fuisti.

In my dreams you were perfect (literally: most beautiful). When I woke you were perfect.

shadron
6th August 2010, 07:26 AM
"Sic amicus Plato, magis amicus veritas"

I'm friend of Plato, more friend of truth...

This is allegedly the phrase Aristotle uttered when asked about something that contradicted his teacher's philosophy. For skeptics I think is invaluable, always side with the truth even when it contradicts your closest friends

Not in Latin, I trust.

zooterkin
6th August 2010, 07:27 AM
Meo in somnio bellissima fuisti. Cum somno solutus sum bellissima fuisti.

In my dreams you were perfect (literally: most beautiful). When I woke you were perfect.

What is the Latin for, "Get your coat, you've pulled"?

Damien Evans
6th August 2010, 07:39 AM
Carpe Jugulum

KoihimeNakamura
6th August 2010, 07:41 AM
What's the phrase for "man wishes to be deceived; deceive him?"

Also:

"Vicis est Volatilis. Sic exsisto velox of pes."
(time is fleeting. Be fast of foot.) I think the translation of that's off, as well as the wording though.

Crossbow
6th August 2010, 08:04 AM
"SPQR" has long been my favorite, however it is a very difficult term to use in a sentence.

aggle-rithm
6th August 2010, 09:19 AM
.
I've got a spare one I'll lease to you....
.

I got A degree, I just never got THAT degree.

geoman
6th August 2010, 06:51 PM
Ore stabit fortis arare placet ore stat.

Delvo
6th August 2010, 07:27 PM
Delirant isti Romani! - ObelixOderint Dum Metuant'Vidi, Vinci, Vini'Carpe Pesca... praeibo peccaboCave piscem inflatibus? :DUrsa sinisterum, rana dextrous.


Bear left, right frog.Qui Cumundrun"Discipulae spectate. Ubi est Brittania. Ubi est Gallia." The first line of my Grade 8 Latin text and just about the only words I remember. :o It's why I'm not judge. :(Si vis pacem, para bellumPecunia non olet.Stercus stercus stercus moriturus sum.Quaecumque Vera. Whatsoever things are true."SPQR" has long been my favorite, however it is a very difficult term to use in a sentence.Ore stabit fortis arare placet ore stat.People at this site are very weird about quotes. In the favorite-movie-line thread, nobody explains anything about where the lines came from or why they were said or what's so great about that, and for that matter they seem to be choosing lines just for how obscure they are and how odd they sound out of context, so their chosen lines will be understood as little as possible by others... and here, we have a pile of Latin phrases without translation, or with translation that obviously needs more explanation because the English that's given still doesn't really mean anything, at least not out of context.

What's the point of communication that's designed to not actually communicate anything?

Doctor Evil
6th August 2010, 08:03 PM
People at this site are very weird about quotes. In the favorite-movie-line thread, nobody explains anything about where the lines came from or why they were said or what's so great about that, and for that matter they seem to be choosing lines just for how obscure they are and how odd they sound out of context, so their chosen lines will be understood as little as possible by others... and here, we have a pile of Latin phrases without translation, or with translation that obviously needs more explanation because the English that's given still doesn't really mean anything, at least not out of context.

What's the point of communication that's designed to not actually communicate anything?

EGO operor non agnosco. Operor vos narro latin?

Ausmerican
6th August 2010, 11:09 PM
Omnia mutantur nos et mutamur in illis - All things change, and we change with them.

Omnia mutantur, nihil interit - Everything changes, nothing perishes.

zooterkin
7th August 2010, 01:36 AM
People at this site are very weird about quotes. In the favorite-movie-line thread, nobody explains anything about where the lines came from or why they were said or what's so great about that, and for that matter they seem to be choosing lines just for how obscure they are and how odd they sound out of context, so their chosen lines will be understood as little as possible by others... and here, we have a pile of Latin phrases without translation, or with translation that obviously needs more explanation because the English that's given still doesn't really mean anything, at least not out of context.

What's the point of communication that's designed to not actually communicate anything?

If only there was some way to make that knowledge available in way that lets people search for it...

jsfisher
7th August 2010, 08:01 AM
...
Ursa sinisterum, rana dextrous.


Bear left, right frog.
...
People at this site are very weird about quotes. In the favorite-movie-line thread, nobody explains anything about where the lines came from or why they were said or what's so great about that, and for that matter they seem to be choosing lines just for how obscure they are and how odd they sound out of context, so their chosen lines will be understood as little as possible by others... and here, we have a pile of Latin phrases without translation, or with translation that obviously needs more explanation because the English that's given still doesn't really mean anything, at least not out of context.

What's the point of communication that's designed to not actually communicate anything?


I am deeply troubled by your complete ignorance of The Muppets Movie (http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=bear+left+right+frog&l=1).

aggle-rithm
9th August 2010, 09:35 AM
In "A Fish Called Wanda", there was an old lady they were trying to kill because she was a witness to a crime, but they kept killing her little yappy dogs by mistake. At the dog funeral, a choir was singing a Latin anthem with the words "Miserere Domini, Canis mortis est."

Lord have mercy, the dog is dead.

Anerystos
11th August 2010, 11:17 AM
"SPQR" has long been my favorite, however it is a very difficult term to use in a sentence.

As far as I remember from Latin lessons a long time ago, "SPQR" was the inscription under a Roman legion's Eagle. I can't remember what the official phrase was, but many other people apparently knew it as "semper porcus que Romani": always pigs these Romans.

Edit for finding out: Senatus Populusque Romanus "The Senate and Roman People".

Piscivore
11th August 2010, 11:24 AM
Carpe Pesca... praeibo peccaboPeople at this site are very weird about quotes. In the favorite-movie-line thread, nobody explains anything about where the lines came from or why they were said or what's so great about that, and for that matter they seem to be choosing lines just for how obscure they are and how odd they sound out of context, so their chosen lines will be understood as little as possible by others... and here, we have a pile of Latin phrases without translation, or with translation that obviously needs more explanation because the English that's given still doesn't really mean anything, at least not out of context.

What's the point of communication that's designed to not actually communicate anything?

Well, mine were my best attempts at "Seize the fish" and "I aim to misbehave".

NWO Sentryman
11th August 2010, 03:06 PM
Oderint Dum Metuant means "let them hate, so long as they fear" - allegedly spoken by Caligula. It would make a pretty cool motto.

skullerello
11th August 2010, 03:43 PM
Altho' it's already been said I use "in hoc signo vinces" next to the sigal I use to represent my name.

Lord Muck oGentry
11th August 2010, 04:00 PM
Io, Saturnalia.

Then Nunc est bibendum or Mehercule! haec materia tam valida est, depending on the company and the hour.

Cactus Wren
12th August 2010, 02:59 AM
I'm not allowed to translate mine.

arthwollipot
12th August 2010, 06:49 AM
Abi in malam rem.

(the phrase my Latin teacher refused to say out loud...)

bjornart
12th August 2010, 08:17 AM
For those of us who don't believe in an afterlife:
Ede, bibe, lude; post mortem nulla voluptas - Eat, drink, and play; there is no pleasure after death."

For those of us who are unsufferable know-it-alls:
Scire tuum nihil est, nisi te scire hoc sciat alter - Your knowledge is nothing when no one else knows that you know it.

For those of us who think patience combined with persistence is a virtue:
Gutta cavat lapidem, non vi, sed saepe cadendo. - A drop of water hollows a stone, not by force, but by continuously dripping.

For those of us who aren't Australian but like to say "No worries" a lot:
Sine cura

Rosencrantz
12th August 2010, 11:17 AM
"Si tacuisses, philosophus mansisses" ("If you had kept your mouth shut, we would have thought you were clever.")

bruto
12th August 2010, 02:39 PM
Or the simpler version of bjornart's third above: "Aquae guttae saxa excavant," little drops of water bore holes in stones.....

19090

arthwollipot
13th August 2010, 12:56 AM
"Si tacuisses, philosophus mansisses" ("If you had kept your mouth shut, we would have thought you were clever.")Latin's a very efficient language, isn't it? Four words to say what takes thirteen in English.

Worm
13th August 2010, 04:38 AM
"Nil Desparandum"

Strictly speaking, I think it translates as 'never despair', but I prefer 'no worries' :)

bruto
13th August 2010, 06:59 AM
Latin's a very efficient language, isn't it? Four words to say what takes thirteen in English.Classical Latin, yes, medieval Latin often the opposite. But how I cussed Tacitus back in school for leaving half the words implied!

Hapexamendios
13th August 2010, 09:47 AM
Nil satis nisi optimum - nothing but the best is good enough.

I seem to remember one of Terry Pratchett's characters using the pseudo-Latin 'sodomy non sapient' which I assume means 'buggered if I know'.

Chaos
13th August 2010, 12:06 PM
As far as I remember from Latin lessons a long time ago, "SPQR" was the inscription under a Roman legion's Eagle. I can't remember what the official phrase was, but many other people apparently knew it as "semper porcus que Romani": always pigs these Romans.

Edit for finding out: Senatus Populusque Romanus "The Senate and Roman People".

"Sono Pazzi Questi Romani" - "Those Romans are crazy"

Okay, its Italian, not Latin, but still... :D