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Skeptic Ginger
7th June 2011, 01:05 PM
There's a new satellite up there getting incredible images of the Sun beyond what we've had before and today an M2 flare was caught in action: Wow!

NJN0hWMrugE&feature=youtu.be

Here it is (http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2011/07jun11/M2_CME_304_large_crop.mpg) in mpeg format, much better if you can view it in that media.


And a lot more on The Sun Today (http://www.thesuntoday.org/current-observations/a-spectacular-event-a-filamentprominence-eruption-to-blow-your-socks-off/) web page. Whoa, watch the videos in the bottom two images in different wavelengths. You can see the shock wave going across the Sun's surface and the effect of some of the material when it falls back on the Sun's surface. The top video has an audio commentary explaining what you are seeing in the different wavelengths.

ElMondoHummus
7th June 2011, 01:09 PM
OMG! Somebody shot the sun!! :eek:

;)

sinclairmcevoy
7th June 2011, 01:24 PM
Holy crap! That was mind boggling! Thanks for sharing that.

One Skunk Todd
7th June 2011, 02:03 PM
I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that was not real time. Also, was that multiple earth masses being spewed out?

Beerina
7th June 2011, 02:31 PM
As the sun is 800k miles in diameter, that would be faster than the speed of light :)


I do wonder how long it took, though. Days? A day? And I understand that though it looks like gravity pulled the burst back down in nice ballistic arcs, the distances are actually so vast the gases follow magnetic lines, like metal filings on paper over a magnet?

AdMan
7th June 2011, 02:34 PM
Wow, that was incredible!

Phil Plait (http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/06/07/the-sun-lets-loose-a-huge-explosion/) says it blasted a billion tons of material away from the sun (though most of it fell back into it) and reached a size over a million kilometers across. Yikes.

Skeptic Ginger
7th June 2011, 04:07 PM
I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that was not real time. Also, was that multiple earth masses being spewed out?
That would be correct. The distances are so immense that took several hours despite the energy involved. Then it takes from 2-3 days for the CME particles to reach as far out as Earth.

Bram Kaandorp
7th June 2011, 04:16 PM
That would be correct. The distances are so immense that took several hours despite the energy involved. Then it takes from 2-3 days for the CME particles to reach as far out as Earth.

With real-time, it's meant that it is not played at normal speed, but slowed down.

And I think that it must be.

Skeptic Ginger
7th June 2011, 05:48 PM
With real-time, it's meant that it is not played at normal speed, but slowed down.

And I think that it must be.

Slowed down? I think you have that backward. It's a time lapse. It is sped up.

Skeptic Ginger
7th June 2011, 05:51 PM
...
I'm not saying you are right or wrong, ...Well I will. If sputnik was serious he's definitely wrong. It's not even clear if that CME will hit the Earth. Individual flares are not specifically related to global warming and it isn't even that unique of a flare. It's the imaging that is new, not the event, though it was a particularly large flare.

SDO's ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY (AIA) (http://aia.lmsal.com/)Overview

The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) for the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is designed to provide an unprecedented view of the solar corona, taking images that span at least 1.3 solar diameters in multiple wavelengths nearly simultaneously, at a resolution of about 1 arcsec and at a cadence of 10 seconds or better. The primary goal of the AIA Science Investigation is to use these data, together with data from other SDO instruments and from other observatories, to significantly improve our understanding of the physics behind the activity displayed by the Sun's atmosphere, which drives space weather in the heliosphere and in planetary environments. The AIA will produce data required for quantitative studies of the evolving coronal magnetic field, and the plasma that it holds, both in quiescent phases and during flares and eruptions. The AIA science investigation aims to utilize these data in a comprehensive research program to provide new understanding of the observed processes and, ultimately, to guide development of advanced forecasting tools needed by the user community of the Living With a Star (LWS) program.
The images that have been coming in from the AIA have been one fantastic image after another. There will be more to come.

Bram Kaandorp
7th June 2011, 05:52 PM
Slowed down? I think you have that backward. It's a time lapse. It is sped up.

Ah, my bad.

Still, point is that real-time means that the footage is shown at normal speed, which is not the case here.

AdMan
7th June 2011, 05:57 PM
Ah, my bad.

Still, point is that real-time means that the footage is shown at normal speed, which is not the case here.


I think you misunderstood. What was correct was the statement that it was not real time.

Bram Kaandorp
7th June 2011, 06:04 PM
I think you misunderstood. What was correct was the statement that it was not real time.

Which is what I said.

"Still, point is that real-time means that the footage is shown at normal speed, which is not the case here."

Cheers

Skeptic Ginger
7th June 2011, 06:09 PM
...one of the most spectacular prominence eruptions ever observed, in fact, one could call it a "prominence explosion" (http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/hotshots/index.html/)

Spectacular because of the detail of the observation, and because it was so large physically, but it was only an M2 flare energy-wise. The scale based on X-rays that reach the orbiting Earth satellites at the speed of light so minutes after the eruption, goes from A, B, C, M and X (http://www.swpc.noaa.gov/rt_plots/xray_5mBL.html), and each level has a scale like the mag scale of earthquakes. X flares occur from time to time, usually as the Sun gets closer to the solar maximum. We just left the solar minimum and I can't recall exactly but there have been less than 10 M flares so far this cycle, probably less than 5.

solar flare review (http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/sftheory/)

SOLAR CYCLE
The approximately 11-year quasi-periodic variation in frequency or number of sunspots, coronal mass ejections, solar flares, and other solar activity.

solar flares' impact on Earth weather (http://hesperia.gsfc.nasa.gov/sftheory/questions.htm#weather)

AdMan
7th June 2011, 06:14 PM
Which is what I said.

"Still, point is that real-time means that the footage is shown at normal speed, which is not the case here."

Cheers


Not to belabor the point, but I read your earlier post as saying that Skeptic Ginger was incorrect, while in fact she was saying the same thing as you then repeated.

Nevermind, no big deal and not worth discussing further.

steve s
7th June 2011, 07:25 PM
There's a new satellite up there getting incredible images of the Sun beyond what we've had before and today an M2 flare was caught in action: Wow!

That's too cool. The purple-ish video is the best one. The debris falling back down looks like black ink dripped into a container of water.

Steve S

AdMan
7th June 2011, 08:17 PM
Nope - the CME shown is not in the least extraordinary. It is a regular occurance as are the sunspots and 11 year cycles. The reason it's so cool is because we are looking at the latest technology capturing the events.



Jeez, OK, if you want to keep belaboring the point, that is exactly what I meant.

It's extraordinary because it's rare that we have been able to see it in this way.

It doesn't mean that this has never happened.

It's a relatively rare event, which we have been able to capture with relatively rare accuracy.

I think it's funny how weirdly defensive you appear to be about this.

The Man
7th June 2011, 08:33 PM
There's a new satellite up there getting incredible images of the Sun beyond what we've had before and today an M2 flare was caught in action: Wow!

NJN0hWMrugE&feature=youtu.be

Here it is (http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2011/07jun11/M2_CME_304_large_crop.mpg) in mpeg format, much better if you can view it in that media.


And a lot more on The Sun Today (http://www.thesuntoday.org/current-observations/a-spectacular-event-a-filamentprominence-eruption-to-blow-your-socks-off/) web page. Whoa, watch the videos in the bottom two images in different wavelengths. You can see the shock wave going across the Sun's surface and the effect of some of the material when it falls back on the Sun's surface. The top video has an audio commentary explaining what you are seeing in the different wavelengths.

Dang, I hope most of what didn't fall back ain't headed our way!!

ETA:

Looks like it ain't..

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/badastronomy/2011/06/07/the-sun-lets-loose-a-huge-explosion/


Again, the good news is that we’re not in any danger from this; it wasn’t aimed our way (most of these types of events miss us). But as I’ve said before, the solar cycle is heating up and we can expect to see more incredible events from our friendly neighborhood star in the coming years.


Thanks phil (and AdMan)

This time...

Skeptic Ginger
7th June 2011, 09:42 PM
Dang, I hope most of what didn't fall back ain't headed our way!!

......Fudge! I hope it will at least strike a glancing blow. It needs to be a strong solar storm for the auroras to make it this far south. I love seeing the aurora here in WA.

The Man
8th June 2011, 12:46 AM
Fudge! I hope it will at least strike a glancing blow. It needs to be a strong solar storm for the auroras to make it this far south. I love seeing the aurora here in WA.


Well, let's hope just a glance.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_1989_geomagnetic_storm

Cuddles
8th June 2011, 02:06 AM
Several posts removed to AAH. Stay on topic. If you want to talk about global warming, there is a thread for that here (http://forums.randi.org/showthread.php?t=176635).

jadey
8th June 2011, 03:48 AM
I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that was not real time. Also, was that multiple earth masses being spewed out?

The narrator of the video on the Sun Today site (linked in the OP) states that the event occured over about 3 hours.

Skeptic Ginger
8th June 2011, 09:49 AM
The narrator of the video on the Sun Today site (linked in the OP) states that the event occured over about 3 hours.So I estimated correctly. I'm getting better at this. :D

Michael Mozina
9th June 2011, 02:42 PM
There's a new satellite up there getting incredible images of the Sun beyond what we've had before and today an M2 flare was caught in action: Wow!

NJN0hWMrugE&feature=youtu.be

Here it is (http://www.spaceweather.com/swpod2011/07jun11/M2_CME_304_large_crop.mpg) in mpeg format, much better if you can view it in that media.

Thanks for that link. FYI, that was a 'dark filament' eruption flare. I won't hijack your thread, but you can see the dark thread erupt remarkably well. SDO is going to revolutionize solar physics as we know it.