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CBL4
11th November 2004, 02:54 PM
Cartwheels and handstands have gotten an 11-year-old girl temporarily bounced out of her Los Angeles-area school.

Deirdre Faegre was suspended for a week after repeatedly disobeying school officials who told her not to perform gymnastic stunts during lunchtime.http://www.cnn.com/2004/EDUCATION/11/11/no.cartwheels.reut/index.html
Arguably she should be suspended for not following the rule but that just begs the question of why the rule was there.

CBL

wipeout
11th November 2004, 03:02 PM
Next day, hundreds of kids do cartwheels and demand a week's holiday... er... suspension. ;)

Insurance thing maybe? Strange, as it seems a lot less risky than American football.

Rob Lister
11th November 2004, 03:04 PM
Originally posted by CBL4
http://www.cnn.com/2004/EDUCATION/11/11/no.cartwheels.reut/index.html
Arguably she should be suspended for not following the rule but that just begs the question of why the rule was there.

CBL

maybe because
"Our first concern is the safety of all children," San Jose-Edison Academy Principal Denise Patton told the San Gabriel Valley Tribune.

Patton said Deirdre could accidentally strike another student, or injure herself, and other children could get hurt trying to imitate Deirdre, who has been doing gymnastics for five years.

I can see that happening. I tend not to second-guess teachers unless there is a clear and present reason not to do so. Sometimes they are idiots too but then again, sometimes we all are. It's a mountian/molehill kind of thing. Just keep an eye out that it doesn't turn into a inch/yard type of thing.

Grammatron
11th November 2004, 03:22 PM
Originally posted by wipeout
Next day, hundreds of kids do cartwheels and demand a week's holiday... er... suspension. ;)

Insurance thing maybe? Strange, as it seems a lot less risky than American football.

I don't think it's less risky, but if someone was playing American football in a lunch area after being told repeatedly not to they would be suspended as well.

aerocontrols
11th November 2004, 03:29 PM
Originally posted by CBL4
http://www.cnn.com/2004/EDUCATION/11/11/no.cartwheels.reut/index.html
Arguably she should be suspended for not following the rule but that just begs the question of why the rule was there.

CBL

I don't see that there was a rule against cartwheels.

She was disobeying school officials, which is what she was suspended for.

Charlie Monoxide
11th November 2004, 03:32 PM
Maybe she's an early bloomer and is trying to impress the boys ....

Charlie (Man Show - girls on trampolines!) Monoxide

Zep
11th November 2004, 03:43 PM
It would have been LOTS smarter all round to tell he she could do her gymnastics at lunch time BUT only in the gymnasium. If she wanted to practice, sure, why not. But do it supervised and in the right place. She gets to tumble, school has no worries about safety, everyone happy.

Why don't some people THINK for a change?

Lisa Simpson
11th November 2004, 03:50 PM
I doubt they'd let her use the gymnasium either, at least not without supervision. And what teacher is going to give up lunch break to watch the kid tumble.

My youngest son got kicked in the chest by a boy who was practicing karate on the playground. Left him with a foot-sized bruise on his sternum.

Zep
11th November 2004, 05:35 PM
Originally posted by Lisa Simpson
I doubt they'd let her use the gymnasium either, at least not without supervision. And what teacher is going to give up lunch break to watch the kid tumble.Why the heck not?! What is it with teachers NOT encouraging kids in their interests? Here, provision of lunchtime (and before-school and after-school) extra-curricular activities are usually encouraged. Am I missing something?

Originally posted by Lisa Simpson
My youngest son got kicked in the chest by a boy who was practicing karate on the playground. Left him with a foot-sized bruise on his sternum. Well, that's (a) assault, no matter which way you slice it, and (b) NOT proper karate at all - the kid's sensei should have a real stern warning lined up for him (in my karate school, such a deliberate act would get you tossed out, no correspondence entered into).

Rob Lister
11th November 2004, 05:50 PM
Originally posted by Zep
Why the heck not?! What is it with teachers NOT encouraging kids in their interests? Here, provision of lunchtime (and before-school and after-school) extra-curricular activities are usually encouraged. Am I missing something?

So which teacher should give up lunch to do that? What other activities should the kids be supervised in during lunch?

Here's an idea. Let's have them all eat lunch!

I don't mean to be short but herding cats is hard enough without throwing in a bunch of mice and small flightless birds.

Lisa Simpson
11th November 2004, 06:06 PM
Originally posted by Zep
Why the heck not?! What is it with teachers NOT encouraging kids in their interests? Here, provision of lunchtime (and before-school and after-school) extra-curricular activities are usually encouraged. Am I missing something?

Better unions.

Well, that's (a) assault, no matter which way you slice it, and (b) NOT proper karate at all - the kid's sensei should have a real stern warning lined up for him (in my karate school, such a deliberate act would get you tossed out, no correspondence entered into).

(a) yes, but I didn't file charges (felt sorry for the little bugger, mommy and daddy were divorcing AND putting the kids in the middle). Later, I found out this wasn't the first time it had happened.

(b) yes, his mom and dad knew that and took him out of karate since he wasn't playing by the rules.

American
11th November 2004, 06:14 PM
Suspensions are legal, detentions are illegal. Did you know that? State laws say you have to go to school X number of Y hour days a year. Detaining someone longer for any reason is wrongful imprisonment, a felony much like kidnapping.

Don't ask me why they get away with it, especially considering many detainees are 18 years old, and merely threatening to suspend someone if they don't comply with your "offer" to commit a crime against them may itself be a crime.

Zep
11th November 2004, 06:21 PM
Originally posted by Rob Lister
So which teacher should give up lunch to do that? What other activities should the kids be supervised in during lunch?

Here's an idea. Let's have them all eat lunch!

I don't mean to be short but herding cats is hard enough without throwing in a bunch of mice and small flightless birds. Ermm, many teachers encourage this sort of stuff. Many of them are pleased to contribute their spare time to coaching soccer teams, gymnasts, swimmers, divers, etc, including on weekends. Those who do this at lunch time take their lunch break before/after "official" lunch break. Ditto for the kids.

This all takes some kids in the playground who, instead of scoring E or knifing/shooting each other over $200 Nikes as a form of asset-redistribution, keeps them healthily occupied working off steam elsewhere. Not all kids or teachers do this sort of thing - it just sounded like a solution for this girl instead of simply putting a total prohibition on an otherwise healthy and fun activity. Silly me for thinking outside the box.

Oh, and the teachers DO have a good union.