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View Full Version : Lew Rockwell on the "war on Christmas"


billydkid
15th December 2005, 02:48 PM
http://www.lewrockwell.com/rockwell/celebrate-christmas.html

TobiasTheViking
15th December 2005, 02:49 PM
how informative :/

The Central Scrutinizer
15th December 2005, 03:46 PM
When is he going to write an article explaining why the Libertarian Party is such a failure?

billydkid
15th December 2005, 04:58 PM
When is he going to write an article explaining why the Libertarian Party is such a failure?

Wow, good one CS. You really got me with that one.

billydkid
15th December 2005, 05:00 PM
how informative :/

I have no idea what you are talking about. You thought the article was boring and pointless, fine. I thought it did a good job of pointing out the idiocy of those crying about how we are destroying the meaning of Christmas. and what is the point of that quote you inserted into you post?

Libertarian
15th December 2005, 05:07 PM
Does this count?

http://www.mises.org/story/1499

It is a long struggle but it is the way the struggle for liberty has always taken place. But somewhere along the way, some people, enticed by the prospect of a fast track to reform, rethought this idea. Perhaps we should try the same technique that the left did. We should get our people in power and displace their people, and then we can bring about change toward liberty. In fact, isn't this the most important goal of all? So long as the left controls the state, it will expand in ways that are incompatible with freedom. We need to take back the state.

So goes the logic. What is wrong with it? The state's only function is as an apparatus of coercion and compulsion. That is its distinguishing mark. It is what makes the state the state. To the same extent that the state responds well to arguments that it should be larger and more powerful, it is institutionally hostile to anyone who says that it should be less powerful and less coercive. That is not to say that some work from the "inside" cannot do some good, some of the time. But it is far more likely that the state will convert the libertarian than for the libertarian to convert the state.

billydkid
15th December 2005, 05:25 PM
Does this count?

http://www.mises.org/story/1499

It is a long struggle but it is the way the struggle for liberty has always taken place. But somewhere along the way, some people, enticed by the prospect of a fast track to reform, rethought this idea. Perhaps we should try the same technique that the left did. We should get our people in power and displace their people, and then we can bring about change toward liberty. In fact, isn't this the most important goal of all? So long as the left controls the state, it will expand in ways that are incompatible with freedom. We need to take back the state.

So goes the logic. What is wrong with it? The state's only function is as an apparatus of coercion and compulsion. That is its distinguishing mark. It is what makes the state the state. To the same extent that the state responds well to arguments that it should be larger and more powerful, it is institutionally hostile to anyone who says that it should be less powerful and less coercive. That is not to say that some work from the "inside" cannot do some good, some of the time. But it is far more likely that the state will convert the libertarian than for the libertarian to convert the state.


You know, it strikes me as extremely odd that so many people in here reserve their most vehement contempt for libertarians - a group of people who's agenda consists entirely and essentially of promoting individual liberty and protecting the basic rights of citizens - and yet other groups -say, the Greens or the Rights for Animals parties or even that Ross Perot party and other parties that actually do have radical agendas - are given a pass. The Libertarian agenda is not very radical at all and emphasizes those values this country was supposedly founded on and yet it inspires utter hatred in many people. I have to say I find it very confusing. The libertarians simply wants to hold the state to same moral standards that individuals are held to.

Libertarian
15th December 2005, 05:31 PM
Good point. Afterall, there is no such thing as a "group." There are only individuals.

It seems people feel threatened by libertarianism, for some reason. I think it's due to the perceived risk associated with it.