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AmyWilson
29th March 2006, 02:29 AM
I'd just like your opinions.

Is religion and spiritualism cripping science and evolution? :)

Thanks. :)

ned flandas
29th March 2006, 02:42 AM
i dont think i understand the question

Darat
29th March 2006, 03:39 AM
I'd just like your opinions.

Is religion and spiritualism cripping science and evolution? :)

Thanks. :)


What do you think?

Mojo
29th March 2006, 03:58 AM
I'd just like your opinions.

Is religion and spiritualism cripping science and evolution? Religion may have some capacity to cripple science education, if the proponents of religion insist on having it taught in science lessons.

Evolution, however, will carry on happening whatever you believe.

It's true. :)

Zep
29th March 2006, 04:37 AM
Bet you can't spell even one of the multi-syllable words with your eyes closed, kid.

UrsulaV
29th March 2006, 06:13 AM
Asking if religion cripples evolution is like asking if religion cripples gravity or plate tectonics--it's just not applicable. The fittest will continue to survive and reproduce more than the unfit, and DNA will continue to reproduce with occasional minor imperfections, no matter how religion feels about the matter.

The religious establishment may occasionally put undue barrier to the pursuit of science, but how much or if at all depends largely on the religion, I suspect (or perhaps more accurately, those espousing it.)

:) It's true. :)

Cosmo
29th March 2006, 06:29 AM
You're stealing Pauliesonne's job.

It's true. :)

Complexity
29th March 2006, 06:35 AM
Religion and spiritualism cripples minds. Those who have been infected are less inclined to learn science, do science, or improve some aspects of technology.

Evolution is quite unaffected by religion and spiritualism. It continues regardless of what people think about it.

drkitten
29th March 2006, 06:47 AM
Is religion and spiritualism cripping science and evolution? :)


In the United States, it's trying to. More accurately, proponents of religion are specifically trying to cripple science and evolution.

Mercutio
29th March 2006, 06:49 AM
My cousin, who was a biology major at a creationist university, asked me one time "what is the purpose of wasps? What do they do for us?" If she approaches, say, bacteria from that standpoint, rather than from a natural selection standpoint, she puts herself several steps behind in any attempt to fight antibiotic resistance. The purpose of wasps is to make baby wasps. Life does not revolve around us, it evolves along with us.

Most religious people are perfectly fine with science, though; this example is a very specific case and cannot be generalized.

wastepanel
29th March 2006, 06:50 AM
Religion and spiritualism cripples minds. Those who have been infected are less inclined to learn science, do science, or improve some aspects of technology.

Evolution is quite unaffected by religion and spiritualism. It continues regardless of what people think about it.

I'd like to see a source on this quote. This seems like quite the generalization. Although the loudest religious people seem to be the most outrageous in terms of scientific knowledge, there's alot of people in this world that are both religious and scientifically educated.

drkitten
29th March 2006, 06:58 AM
I'd like to see a source on this quote. This seems like quite the generalization. Although the loudest religious people seem to be the most outrageous in terms of scientific knowledge, there's alot of people in this world that are both religious and scientifically educated.

I believe the source for the quote in question is "Complexity" -- the guy what looks like Alan Turing upthread.

wastepanel
29th March 2006, 07:01 AM
I believe the source for the quote in question is "Complexity" -- the guy what looks like Alan Turing upthread.

lol

c4ts
29th March 2006, 07:13 AM
How the heck can spiritualism cripple evolution? It's a natural process that is going to happen regardless of what anybody believes.

SuperCoolGuy
29th March 2006, 07:16 AM
I'd just like your opinions.

Is religion and spiritualism cripping science and evolution? :)

Thanks. :)

Shouldn't you be jumping on a trampoline seducing guys watching fox news or something?

http://forums.randi.org/showthread.php?t=54420

Jorghnassen
29th March 2006, 08:59 AM
Well, let me just say religion and spiritualism can't stop evolution because it's a natural process. I'm only the (relatively large n)th person to say it in this thread...

/if you want to feed the trolls, might as well do it with spam.

Tricky
29th March 2006, 09:00 AM
They is.

Marquis de Carabas
29th March 2006, 09:01 AM
Spiritualism stop a Mitsubishi rally car? Please... :rolleyes:

cbish
29th March 2006, 09:07 AM
Is this another Amy Wilson post and run?

Tricky
29th March 2006, 09:08 AM
Is this another Amy Wilson post and run?
It are.

alfaniner
29th March 2006, 09:17 AM
Maybe.

It's Drew.

http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/thumb/9/9d/180px-Drew_carey.JPG

Complexity
29th March 2006, 10:31 AM
I'd like to see a source on this quote. This seems like quite the generalization. Although the loudest religious people seem to be the most outrageous in terms of scientific knowledge, there's alot of people in this world that are both religious and scientifically educated.
I'm the source of this 'quote'.

strathmeyer
29th March 2006, 11:00 AM
Well, first you have to decide what kind of person you are. If you're a whimp, I'd just run 'em over with my car. That's sure to leave some long term damage. However, it may result in death, which may not be your main objective. If you think you can handle it, I reccommend using a baseball bat. That way, you can avoid the head an major organs, striking repeatedly at the knees, and even the hands and feet. And then I'd go play with kittens.

http://members.tripod.com/~BellaPalazzo_Ragdoll/K/days4wk.jpg

Dr Adequate
29th March 2006, 11:20 AM
Religious whackjobs would cripple science if they could.

"Teaching religious ideas mislabeled as science is detrimental to scientific education: It sets up a false conflict between science and religion, misleads our youth about the nature of scientific inquiry, and thereby compromises our ability to respond to the problems of an increasingly technological world. Our capacity to cope with problems of food production, health care, and even national defense will be jeopardized if we deliberately strip our citizens of the power to distinguish between the phenomena of nature and supernatural articles of faith. "Creation-science" simply has no place in the public-school science classroom."

---NOBEL LAUREATES : Luis W. Alvarez, Carl D. Anderson, Christian B. Anfinsen, Julius Axelrod, David Baltimore, John Bardeen, Paul Berg, Hans A. Bethe, Konrad Bloch, Nicolaas Bloembergen, Michael S. Brown, Herbert C. Brown, Melvin Calvin, S. Chandrasekhar, Leon N. Cooper, Allan Cormack, Andre Cournand, Francis Crick, Renato Dulbecco, Leo Esaki, Val L. Fitch, William A. Fowler, Murray Gell-Mann, Ivar Giaever, Walter Gilbert, Donald A. Glaser, Sheldon Lee Glashow, Joseph L. Goldstein, Roger Guillemin, Roald Hoffmann, Robert Hofstadter, Robert W. Holley, David H. Hubel, Charles B. Huggins, H. Gobind Khorana, Arthur Kornberg, Polykarp Kusch, Willis E. Lamb, Jr., William Lipscomb, Salvador E. Luria, Barbara McClintock, Bruce Merrifield, Robert S. Mulliken, Daniel Nathans, Marshall Nirenberg, John H. Northrop, Severo Ochoa, George E. Palade, Linus Pauling, Arno A. Penzias, Edward M. Purcell, Isidor I. Rabi, Burton Richter, Frederick Robbins, J. Robert Schrieffer, Glenn T. Seaborg, Emilio Segre, Hamilton O. Smith, George D. Snell, Roger Sperry, Henry Taube, Howard M. Temin, Samuel C. C. Ting, Charles H. Townes, James D. Watson, Steven Weinberg, Thomas H. Weller, Eugene P. Wigner, Kenneth G. Wilson, Robert W. Wilson, Rosalyn Yalow, Chen Ning Yang. * (http://www.skepticwiki.org/wiki/index.php/Evolution_is_losing_support_among_scientists#What_ scientists_say_about_evolution) Fortuantely, the judges in your great and free republic can tell the difference between a proven scientific theory and a witless religious dogma.

Correa Neto
29th March 2006, 12:29 PM
My cousin, who was a biology major at a creationist university, asked me one time "what is the purpose of wasps? What do they do for us?" ...snip...
Besides stinging those who mess with them, some kill those icky critters called spiders.

And some spiders, on their turn, eat other annoying bugs such as mosquitoes and flys.

Then sheŽll ask "what are the purposes of flys and mosquitoes?" and "what they do for us?"...

And the answer will be feed spiders and annoy us. And thus, the Circle of Life is completed [add Lion King theme here]...

Now, my questions are:
What are the purposes of Amy Wilson's hit-and-run posts? What does Amy Wilson does for us?

Ryokan
29th March 2006, 02:02 PM
It depends on the religion.

Aurelian
29th March 2006, 02:05 PM
It ain't the religion and spirtuality...it's fear that can cripple science, technology and evolution. And by evolution, I mean change, not the Darwin/creation debate.

Next question?

UrsulaV
29th March 2006, 03:33 PM
Now, my questions are:
What are the purposes of Amy Wilson's hit-and-run posts? What does Amy Wilson does for us?

Making little Amy Wilson posts...?

the_bgma
29th March 2006, 08:16 PM
For the most part, yes, religion is crippling technology and science. However, there is some merit to looking at the moral sides of issues such as nuclear power, cloning, etc. Unfortunately, science has *allowed* religious influences to take the lead here.




**************************************************
The Bible of the Good and Moral Atheist (http://www.freewebs.com/thebgma/index.htm)

ceo_esq
30th March 2006, 07:46 AM
It depends on the religion.

This is true. Whether a given religious belief system will provide a favorable, neutral, or unfavorable environment for the development of science and technology depends largely on the the metaphysical assumptions involved in the particular religious worldview.

We've examined a number of aspects of this subject, and in significant detail, in the thread entitled "Is religion slowing us down?" (http://forums.randi.org/showthread.php?t=7763).

Belz...
30th March 2006, 09:43 AM
My cousin, who was a biology major at a creationist university, asked me one time "what is the purpose of wasps? What do they do for us?"

Ouch.

Correa Neto
31st March 2006, 02:48 PM
Now, my questions are:
What are the purposes of Amy Wilson's hit-and-run posts? What does Amy Wilson does for us?
Making little Amy Wilson posts...?

And maybe our purpose is to answer Amy Wilson's posts? 4.5Gy of evolution over the surface of this rotating ball of boredom aimed towards this goal?

That was a VERY scary tought!
It's true!:)

I managed to calm myself only after remembering evolution has no purpose!
It's true!:)

Now, if you believe in ID, you're in deep *****...
It's true!:)

Mephisto
31st March 2006, 02:59 PM
Is it evolution's fault that I sprout leathery wings and horns when I don't go to church? ;)

SPQR
31st March 2006, 03:33 PM
I'd just like your opinions.

Is religion and spiritualism cripping science and evolution? :)

Thanks. :)
As has been stated previously, nothing, not even the inane ramblings of I.D. proponents, can stop evolution.

The teaching of evolution, maybe. But even then students who have been taught creationism or I.D. and go on to teach others will eventually be weened out of the scientific community as more is learned about the nature and mechansims of evolution.

That's called natural selection. :D

Pae
31st March 2006, 04:41 PM
I'd just like your opinions.

Is religion and spiritualism cripping science and evolution? :)

Science - Yes.

Evolution - No. Nothing humans can do can cripple evolution. Even what some would call crippling, would be a part of evolution.

TimmyBerry
31st March 2006, 05:23 PM
I'd have to say that it really depends on religion, the way it's practiced and taught.. (Ex: a school can be religiously-oriented -AND- have some damn good science classes.)