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View Full Version : U.S. Treasury selling currency with 8888 in serial numbers


Ladewig
23rd May 2006, 03:15 PM
I'm torn on this one.

If I were about to pay for a purchase in a store with a one-dollar bill that had a lot of eights in the serial number and a man asked if he could buy the bill for $5.95, then I think I would sell it to him. After all if I didn't sell it to him and used it instead for my purchase, then the man would simply buy it from the cashier. No admonition or chastisement would convince such a man that 8 is not an inherently lucky number and that he is throwing away money by paying $5.95 for a $1 bill.

Who here would not sell the man the dollar bill for six dollars?

On the other hand, when the Treasury website says..
May this Year of the Goat Note bring you good fortune as
"the three goats bring forth peace by restoring the earth
back to spring-time" in the New Year. http://www.bep.treas.gov/store/section.cfm/364/1826

...then I think that they may be going too far.

MWare
23rd May 2006, 03:37 PM
My father recently got into collecting things from the BEP. This is great since it gives my sisters and I a plethora of ideas (and a nice easy go-to website linked above) for a man that is usually impossible to shop for. He has little interest in "lucky numbers" but he does like many of the special items that are for sale from the treasury. The fact that this particular item is uncirculated would be the main appeal for him. In this case, I don't think there's anything wrong with it.

Unfortunately we know that many will buy the item for its magical number aspect which is, of course, ridiculous. The thing is though, nothing sold on this site is really ever meant to be used in circulation, so if someone uses it to buy something (thinking their purchase will be luckier?) they are doubly an idiot. On the flip side, some particularly attentive collector (I can see my father checking bills for numbers indicating special edition notes) might end up scoring something of moderately more value than they had originally thought. Good for them. The fact that the magic number makes the note easier to recognize is a bonus for collectors and I would imagine is more of the intended demographic for the item than woo-ish folks. At the very least, nothing on the site is claiming that these things are "lucky". The quote above I take as more of a friendly wish (like saying good luck) than a claim of anything supernatural.

It's a bit late in the day, I hope that made sense.

arthwollipot
23rd May 2006, 11:25 PM
Yeah, I'd be happy to sell it.

RSLancastr
24th May 2006, 12:27 PM
I live in a city where around 50% of the population is Chinese.

Back in 1988, there was a lot of this silliness going on.

A friend sold his business to a Chinese couple, and one of the conditions of the sale was that the contracts be signed on 8/8/88.

I also heard that many couples did their best to conceive nine months prior to that date, and that quite a few labors were medically induced so that chilldren would be born on that "auspicious" day.

tracer
24th May 2006, 12:55 PM
My Real Estate agent also recommended I set the asking price for my house in a dollar-figure that ended in "...,888". He said it was, quote, "Good Fung Shui".

In actuality, I'll bet he holds a belief in neither Chinese numerology nor Fung Shui, but instead in knowing what Chinese home-shoppers are on the lookout for.

Rasmus
24th May 2006, 01:53 PM
...then I think that they may be going too far.

I think it's a nice idea to offer the entire series.

AND! ... I get first dibs on the 666-Edition!

RSLancastr
24th May 2006, 02:26 PM
I've been told that the reason the number "8" is considered to be lucky in Chinese culture is that the word for "eight" sounds the same as the word for "luck" or "good fortune.

Jon.
25th May 2006, 04:36 PM
I've been told that the reason the number "8" is considered to be lucky in Chinese culture is that the word for "eight" sounds the same as the word for "luck" or "good fortune.

Yes, and 4 is unlucky because it sounds like "death." In Vancouver, they now sometimes build tall buildings with two 8th floors (8A and 8B), no 4th and no 13th.:rolleyes:

Forty-Two
26th May 2006, 02:37 PM
In actuality, I'll bet he holds a belief in neither Chinese numerology nor Fung Shui, but instead in knowing what Chinese home-shoppers are on the lookout for.
That's why many casinos are constructed and decorated with "good fung shui" in mind. It's not that the owners think it'll mystically bring them fortune; they know that many Asian cultures have a tradition of gambling and superstitious Asian customers will be more inclined to gamble at a place that they believe will bring them more luck.

Just thinking
28th May 2006, 07:17 AM
Do they consider 1000 just as lucky as 8? They should.

Beady
28th May 2006, 07:27 AM
That's why many casinos are constructed and decorated with "good fung shui" in mind.

Having seen the P&T Fung Shui episode I have to ask, how do you (they)know good fung shui from bad?

RSLancastr
30th May 2006, 02:10 PM
Do they consider 1000 just as lucky as 8? They should.Only those who understand binary.

RSLancastr
30th May 2006, 02:14 PM
I think I've told this story here before, but years ago, neighbors were having difficulty selling their house, in what was a very hot housing market for Chinese buyers.

They finally found out that their house's location was very undesirable to Chinese people, due to some feng shui details.

When I asked a Chinese coworker about this, he said "Yes, some Chinese people are superstitious and would not buy that house. Others are NOT superstitious, and would simply hang a mirror on the front door to reflect the bad luck away."

:confused:

Ladewig
30th May 2006, 07:01 PM
Only those who understand binary.

You know what they say: There are 10 types of people in the world - those that understand binary and those that do not.

RSLancastr
31st May 2006, 01:08 PM
You know what they say: There are 10 types of people in the world - those that understand binary and those that do not.They also say: If you are one in a million, there are more than 1,300 Chinese people just like you.

Mercutio
31st May 2006, 01:46 PM
I live in a city where around 50% of the population is Chinese.

Back in 1988, there was a lot of this silliness going on.

A friend sold his business to a Chinese couple, and one of the conditions of the sale was that the contracts be signed on 8/8/88.

I also heard that many couples did their best to conceive nine months prior to that date, and that quite a few labors were medically induced so that chilldren would be born on that "auspicious" day.My aunt got married (second time) on that date. For those reasons, sadly. What was really anoying was that they expected everyone to make a big deal out of it, and an even bigger deal out of their 8th anniversary. (No big plans for 10th)

RSLancastr
31st May 2006, 09:14 PM
My aunt got married (second time) on that date. For those reasons, sadly. What was really anoying was that they expected everyone to make a big deal out of it, and an even bigger deal out of their 8th anniversary. (No big plans for 10th)Is she (or her husband) Chinese?

I've never heard of a Chinese tradition to treat the 8th anniversary as somehow especially worthy of celebration, but it would be consistent, I guess.

Ririon
31st May 2006, 10:16 PM
They also say: If you are one in a million, there are more than 1,300 Chinese people just like you.
"They" say the darndest things. I say: If I ever build a hotel or an office building, it WILL have a 13th floor. Even if I have to hand-carve the elevator button for it myself. :)

Quoting the relevant section of the Douglas Adams book is left as an exercise to the reader. :cool: