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View Full Version : Where Bigfoot Belief Falls Flat on its Face


Daryl17
2nd April 2007, 01:43 PM
There are supposedly thousands of these creatures running around yet, there is not ONE single peice of clear photographic evidence, contrast that with the Javan Rhino http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&q=Javan+Rhino+&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2, which has lots of clear pictures of it and has a population of about 60.

Also take a look at the Baiji (Yangtze River Dolphin), of which there are many pictures and a population of only 'a couple of dozen' , http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&q=Baiji+%28Yangtze+River+Dolphin%29&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2, and they live underwater!

Im sure Bigfoot supporters will say how illusive and shy 'squatches are but thats pure speculation, after all Gorillas are shy but we didnt have a hard time finding them.

Smart_Cookie
2nd April 2007, 02:06 PM
And how about:

1) People have supposedly sighted them here in Manitoba, Canada, where it's below zero (I mean, really freezing, as in -30 to -40 degrees C) for several months of the year, yet these creatures live OUTSIDE? Why don't they freeze to death? If they "hibernate" or stay in caves, etc., wouldn't we then find evidence?

2) There can't just be a couple of them. There must be a sufficient number of them to maintain a healthy breeding population. So, where are they all?

Earthborn
2nd April 2007, 02:13 PM
I have never heard anyone claim that there must be thousands of bigfoots (bigfeet?) still roaming around. I think most bigfoot believers believe they are pretty rare.

Baiji are now considered 'functionally extinct', as they haven't been spotted for some time but no one has claimed that it is impossible that there are still a few left. Absence of evidence does not equal evidence of absence and all that.

Senex
2nd April 2007, 02:19 PM
I don't know anything about Bigfoot except that Leonard Nemoy "In Search of" episode, but I do know that one thread on this site has been very active for over three months and contains enough Bigfoot information for everyone and if you had any balls you would post on that thread and have your simple theory challenged by the experts. There was no need for a new Bigfoot thread.

NobbyNobbs
2nd April 2007, 02:25 PM
And how about:

1) People have supposedly sighted them here in Manitoba, Canada, where it's below zero (I mean, really freezing, as in -30 to -40 degrees C) for several months of the year, yet these creatures live OUTSIDE? Why don't they freeze to death? If they "hibernate" or stay in caves, etc., wouldn't we then find evidence?

2) There can't just be a couple of them. There must be a sufficient number of them to maintain a healthy breeding population. So, where are they all?



1) I just saw an episode of Planet Earth on the Discovery Channel (what an awesome series! I highly recommend it.) This episode focused on the Arctic and Antarctic regions, and explained how penguins survive winters that reach -60 F with winds of up to 100 mph. It can be done. (No, I don't believe in Bigfoot, but the conditions are survivable.)

2) Many species have been brought back from the brink of extinction. Condors, for example. And wasn't there that really ugly fish that was thought to have been extinct millions of years ago that some fisherman caught, and now we realize there are tons of them?


So while I don't believe in the existence of Bigfoot, the reasons you have given aren't the ones that rule out the possibility. Not by themselves, at any rate.

Pipirr
2nd April 2007, 02:50 PM
And how about:

1) People have supposedly sighted them here in Manitoba, Canada, where it's below zero (I mean, really freezing, as in -30 to -40 degrees C) for several months of the year, yet these creatures live OUTSIDE? Why don't they freeze to death? If they "hibernate" or stay in caves, etc., wouldn't we then find evidence?

2) There can't just be a couple of them. There must be a sufficient number of them to maintain a healthy breeding population. So, where are they all?


Mate, hard though it is to believe, Manitobans are real! Although they are extremely rare, which is why so few people have ever encountered one.

They survive the winters by living in 'caves' made of wood, and sometimes the young Manitobans build quinzhees, but these are not thought to be permanent residences.

In fact, some Manitobans have very large territorial ranges; I met a female Manitoban in Denmark, amazingly enough, and even returned with her to Manitoba. I discovered that while most Manitobans live at great distances from each other, sometimes they come together in groups of two or three families, and form what they call 'towns'. Marvellous!

Yes, Manitobans are real, and I have met one!

Starthinker
2nd April 2007, 04:43 PM
Get ready for another 60 pages of the same ol', same ol'.

Smart_Cookie
2nd April 2007, 06:58 PM
Get ready for another 60 pages of the same ol', same ol'.

Woops, sorry! I've never had time to read the hundreds of pages on the other Bigfoot thread. There are only so many hours in a day.

Smart_Cookie
2nd April 2007, 06:59 PM
Mate, hard though it is to believe, Manitobans are real! Although they are extremely rare, which is why so few people have ever encountered one.

They survive the winters by living in 'caves' made of wood, and sometimes the young Manitobans build quinzhees, but these are not thought to be permanent residences.

In fact, some Manitobans have very large territorial ranges; I met a female Manitoban in Denmark, amazingly enough, and even returned with her to Manitoba. I discovered that while most Manitobans live at great distances from each other, sometimes they come together in groups of two or three families, and form what they call 'towns'. Marvellous!

Yes, Manitobans are real, and I have met one!

I hear the numbers in the wild are dwindling. They're all migrating West to somewhere called all-berrttt-aaaa
:D

Smart_Cookie
2nd April 2007, 07:05 PM
1) I just saw an episode of Planet Earth on the Discovery Channel (what an awesome series! I highly recommend it.) This episode focused on the Arctic and Antarctic regions, and explained how penguins survive winters that reach -60 F with winds of up to 100 mph. It can be done. (No, I don't believe in Bigfoot, but the conditions are survivable.)

2) Many species have been brought back from the brink of extinction. Condors, for example. And wasn't there that really ugly fish that was thought to have been extinct millions of years ago that some fisherman caught, and now we realize there are tons of them?


So while I don't believe in the existence of Bigfoot, the reasons you have given aren't the ones that rule out the possibility. Not by themselves, at any rate.



Thanks for the nitpick.

1) I was presuming that since Bigfoot was nominally primate-like, they would be similar to gorillas and chimps and man, and wouldn't be able to survive those temps without SOME kind of assistance, whether that was evolving a majorly thick coat like a polar bear, or using some "technology" to survive.
(Besides, I thought what helps penguins survive those temps is to band together in large groups for added warmth.)

NobbyNobbs
2nd April 2007, 08:25 PM
Thanks for the nitpick.

1) I was presuming that since Bigfoot was nominally primate-like, they would be similar to gorillas and chimps and man, and wouldn't be able to survive those temps without SOME kind of assistance, whether that was evolving a majorly thick coat like a polar bear, or using some "technology" to survive.
(Besides, I thought what helps penguins survive those temps is to band together in large groups for added warmth.)

Right on both counts, which is why I was merely nitpicking rather than seriously debating.

By the way, a team of two cameramen spent an entire year under those conditions I mentioned, filming the penguins and other wildlife.