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View Full Version : Shocker: more racial stupidities (comedian get censored/'fired' for using "n word")


bigred
5th September 2007, 10:24 PM
http://www.local10.com/entertainment/14051896/detail.html

Also shocking: the NAACP and Al Sharpton were right in the thick of the brilliance.

LOL @ having a funeral for a WORD. Just when you think it all can't get any more ridiculous.....

shecky
7th September 2007, 01:01 AM
Yawn...

slingblade
8th September 2007, 11:29 AM
See my mouth? See my foot? They're about to get reacquainted, I fear. :blush

Red, sorry to butt-in to your life like this, but from reading you posts over the last year or so, I have formed the opinion that you seem to have a problem with the issue of race, in general. It seems to me as if you think most, if not all, instances related to racism are just so much pity-party-oh-poor-me-I'm-black-Asian-Hispanic-Latino-Etc. bull puckey.

You seem to have a real hatred for the idea of racism, if not, at the least, a very strong dislike. It's as if you think the whole notion should just go away, in complete silence.

Except, it really can't just go away. The idea doesn't create or perpetuate itself. People made this mess, over centuries, and it may take just as long to rectify it.

And while that happens, life is going to be awkward, painful, frightening, rude, coarse, and unfair for people of every "difference." I often see you nay-saying or pooh-poohing the ideas some people come up with to help us understand race and racism. Yet I rarely see any better, or more workable, ideas from you.

Racism does exist, unnecessarily, and does need to be addressed. But the problem isn't so much with the obvious, or that which you can readily see. Racism is very often insidious, hidden, and disguised. It lurks. That's the secret of its continued success and longevity.

In fact, it is my opinion that by decrying racism so much, you are in fact helping to perpetuate it.

Okay, I've had my say. Flog away--I'm overdue. :D

brodski
8th September 2007, 11:37 AM
Right, so a stand up comedian, hired for an event used "profanities and the N-word". His employers deem this language unacceptable for their event, they stop his show.

Please, tell me why I should care, let alone be outraged about this?

baron
8th September 2007, 02:26 PM
He should have ridiculed homosexuals, the disabled, the homeless or the grieving or indeed any non-racial subject matter. Because that's still OK.

brodski
8th September 2007, 06:12 PM
He should have ridiculed homosexuals, the disabled, the homeless or the grieving or indeed any non-racial subject matter. Because that's still OK.

Really? Would it have been at this event?

YoPopa
8th September 2007, 07:13 PM
Racism does exist, unnecessarily, and does need to be addressed. But the problem isn't so much with the obvious, or that which you can readily see. Racism is very often insidious, hidden, and disguised. It lurks. That's the secret of its continued success and longevity.

In fact, it is my opinion that by decrying racism so much, you are in fact helping to perpetuate it.

Okay, I've had my say. Flog away--I'm overdue. :DSling, I will not reply for Red, but I could have written what Red wrote even if what Red wrote was written rotten. ;)

I think I agree with you in sentiment. I am not so sure that I agree in RW. Racism is a real problem as you say. Will it ever change anything about the problem to attack it as a problem of language? That just seems so 1984 to me.

pipelineaudio
9th September 2007, 02:38 PM
Will it ever change anything about the problem to attack it as a problem of language? That just seems so 1984 to me.

Exactly

dementedcactus
10th September 2007, 10:54 AM
Did we all forget about the First Amendment?

We shouldn't be afraid to offend people with 'bad' words. Perpetuating the need to be protected from the n-word is like trying to stop an infant from getting hurt. It's gonna happen, deal with it, and move on.

ImaginalDisc
10th September 2007, 10:59 AM
Did we all forget about the First Amendment?

We shouldn't be afraid to offend people with 'bad' words. Perpetuating the need to be protected from the n-word is like trying to stop an infant from getting hurt. It's gonna happen, deal with it, and move on.

The First Amendment applies restrictions to the government, not private citisens. For example, if you are a guest in my home, I can kick you out for any damned reason I please, including saying things I do not like.

This message has been brought to you by PFFAAA, People For First Amendment Abuse Awareness.

dementedcactus
10th September 2007, 11:03 AM
Aren't we using the N-word by saying 'N-word'? Just wanted to point that out.

dementedcactus
10th September 2007, 11:09 AM
The First Amendment applies restrictions to the government, not private citisens. For example, if you are a guest in my home, I can kick you out for any damned reason I please, including saying things I do not like.

This message has been brought to you by PFFAAA, People For First Amendment Abuse Awareness.
I would say that the First Amendment gives rights to the people, but it could also be said as putting restrictions on the Government.

It's true that the first amendment is not absolute. It doesn't include lying or spreading government secrets (*cough*Republicans*cough*). But it surely was made with the thought that People will say things that other people won't like, and they shouldn't be punished for it.

Cain
10th September 2007, 11:59 AM
Just when you think it all can't get any more ridiculous...

...you come and post here.

ImaginalDisc
10th September 2007, 12:00 PM
I would say that the First Amendment gives rights to the people, but it could also be said as putting restrictions on the Government.

It's true that the first amendment is not absolute. It doesn't include lying or spreading government secrets (*cough*Republicans*cough*). But it surely was made with the thought that People will say things that other people won't like, and they shouldn't be punished for it.

It says nothing to that effect. It only restricts the government.

dementedcactus
10th September 2007, 02:14 PM
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

By George, he's right!

Modified
10th September 2007, 03:30 PM
Wait a minute now; let me get this straight; Eddie Griffin is a comedian?

ponderingturtle
12th September 2007, 04:25 AM
I would say that the First Amendment gives rights to the people, but it could also be said as putting restrictions on the Government.

It's true that the first amendment is not absolute. It doesn't include lying or spreading government secrets (*cough*Republicans*cough*). But it surely was made with the thought that People will say things that other people won't like, and they shouldn't be punished for it.

When you are being paid to perform in front of an audiance the one paying you and such as every right to restrict what you say and stop you if you say things they don't like. YOu have no right to someone elses audiance.

brodski
12th September 2007, 09:26 AM
For those of you who feel that the firing of this comedian was breach of his rights too free speech, try this thought experiment (I donít suggest trying it IRL), go up (hypothetically) to your boss and call them [rule 10]-ing ***** (N-word) (if they are black) or a [rule10]-ing ***** (n-word) lover (the last one being offensive to both racists and non racists, for different reasons). For bonus points make sure that others can here, especially clients/ customers/ members of the public.

Would you escape without sanction? If you would not, would this be wrong, and a breach of your first amendment rights, or is it different?
Explain your answer

bigred
12th September 2007, 06:39 PM
Red, sorry to butt-in to your life like this, but from reading you posts over the last year or so, I have formed the opinion that you seem to have a problem with the issue of race, in general.Yeah I sure as hell do. 2 points to the astute observer. :)

More to the point, I have a MASSIVE problem with the way race relations in this country are going, ie asinine to the point of lunacy. Typical human being idiocy - hey we were racist against minorities in the past.....so let's go too far the other way! After all, 2 wrongs make a right! :boggled:

THAT is what I detest with an all-consuming passion. Sorry if I've harped on it more than you'd care for, but IMO this country has it coming in spades (OOPS OMG excuse me that wasn't mean to be racist!) and there are WAY WAY WAY too many people who are doing just what I said, ie going too far the other way....meanwhile the "silent majority" earns its name painfully well, and the hypersensitivity to anything "racial" continues to spiral outward to ridiculous proportions.


You seem to have a real hatred for the idea of racism, if not, at the least, a very strong dislike. I'm funny that way. er you don't?

It's as if you think the whole notion should just go away, in complete silence.No idea where you got that - I certainly never said/implied it, and sure as hell am not that naive.

People made this mess, over centuries, and it may take just as long to rectify it.um rectifying it HAS been going on for quite some time, if not "centuries" FYI. And we have come a LONG way in rectifying it, esp in the last few decades. Yet ironically, the more we do so, the worse race relations get and the more the hypersensitivity and lunacies multiply.

I often see you nay-saying or pooh-poohing the ideas some people come up with to help us understand race and racism. Examples pls?

Yet I rarely see any better, or more workable, ideas from you.I'll ignore the "got any better ideas" shot and just say that IMO there is little in the way of truly workable solutions, because our society is quite out of control with its PC gibberish, and nowhere is it more rampant than in race relations. Even here at JREF, which prides itself in free speech, intelligence, an open mind etc etc etc - watch this:

honky
cracker
chink
spic
mick
heeb
guido
******

Bet you'll never guess what that last word was. :rolleyes: See? Even JREF cowers in the onslaught of the PC race movement. It's that out of control; that powerful. Hell describing it as asinine and loony don't begin to do it justice. Yet people walk by the elephant in the room (can't say "gorilla" or somebody might have a stroke while whipping out the race card like a 6 shooter) as if it's not even there.

Anyway, back to your questions - I try to do what little I can by speaking out against it whenever it comes up - not much perhaps, but more than most, who are either too stupid to get it or lack the spine to speak out at all. I realize I'm probably spitting into the wind though.

Racism does exist, unnecessarily, and does need to be addressed. But the problem isn't so much with the obvious, or that which you can readily see..One look at the media, esp (for ex) Hollywood tells me differently.

Racism is very often insidious, hidden, and disguised. It lurks. That's the secret of its continued success and longevity.And what do you think all this hypersensitive nonsense is doing? It drives it all the more into "hiding." People don't want to deal with the headache/hassle of the PC whiners gone amok, so they hold their tongue. If people (black people especially) would come out and just call people like Mike Vick scum, which is most obviously is, vs saying nothing or looking the other way while aholes like whoopie goldberg try to deflect blame and generally play the apologist game, that would be much less of a problem.


In fact, it is my opinion that by decrying racism so much, you are in fact helping to perpetuate it.It is my opinion that that is utter nonsense. Nothing personal - you've made excellent posts/points I've seen elsewhere and I would guess we're not so far off in our feelings on much of this, but could be wrong.

SynapticDancer
12th September 2007, 08:40 PM
Okay, okay, I get it, you think this is an example of political correctness gone awry. But, can I ask you this, these rights you speak of, to say whatever you want whenever you want without all that nonsense over political correctness, are they not the same rights that Black Enterprise magazine had when they said "you're fired" immediately following the performance?

I think everyone has agreed so far that this is not an issue of freedom of speech, but I really do not think it's an issue of being politically correct either. This was a private corporation sponsoring a sporting event and they were displeased with the act of a performer they hired to entertain THEIR audience. Should we just ignore the fact that the people who run the magazine had every bit of right to pull the plug on his performance as Mr. Griffin would have to use the racial slur at one of his own shows?

sinclairmcevoy
12th September 2007, 09:02 PM
Red, the list of "words" you posted made me raise my eyebrows. If one is blanked out, why not the rest? Hmmmmm...........

bigred
13th September 2007, 01:17 PM
Okay, okay, I get it, you think this is an example of political correctness gone awry. But, can I ask you this, these rights you speak of, to say whatever you want whenever you want without all that nonsense over political correctness, are they not the same rights that Black Enterprise magazine had when they said "you're fired" immediately following the performance?

I think everyone has agreed so far that this is not an issue of freedom of speech, but I really do not think it's an issue of being politically correct either. This was a private corporation sponsoring a sporting event and they were displeased with the act of a performer they hired to entertain THEIR audience. Should we just ignore the fact that the people who run the magazine had every bit of right to pull the plug on his performance as Mr. Griffin would have to use the racial slur at one of his own shows?
Not at all. Pardon if you feel I got too off the topic there.

NobbyNobbs
13th September 2007, 01:36 PM
First Kathy Griffin is censored...then Eddie Griffin is censored...

It's not 1st Amendment, or racism. It's prejudice against people named "Griffin"!!!

GroundStrength
13th September 2007, 01:48 PM
Racism is very often insidious, hidden, and disguised. It lurks. That's the secret of its continued success and longevity.

In fact, it is my opinion that by decrying racism so much, you are in fact helping to perpetuate it.

How could you tell the difference between racism that is insidious, hidden, and disguised; and someone just being an a-hole?

You can control and legislate how people act (quotas, affirmative action programs, hate-crimes) but not how they feel (who they associate with, like, dislike and for what reasons).