PDA

View Full Version : Large Hornets in Central New Jersey (Asian variety?)


Just thinking
6th September 2007, 08:06 AM
Recently I have noticed very large Hornets making nests (holes) in the soil on my property and my neighbors'. These guys are huge (well over an inch) -- nothing like them have ever been seen alive and flying around by me or anyone else I know in New Jersey, let alone outside in my own yard. My daughter is petrified by them (I don't blame her) and is afraid to go outside. I did some Googling only to find reports of folks claiming to have caught Giant Japanese Hornets in their back yards in Pennsylvania --- again, a first time for many of them.

Does anyone know anything about this? All of their nests have been underground (about 6 - 8) and spraying the holes with Hornet spray does not seem to stop them from re-establishing the nest in a day or two.

ponderingturtle
6th September 2007, 08:22 AM
Recently I have noticed very large Hornets making nests (holes) in the soil on my property and my neighbors'. These guys are huge (well over an inch) -- nothing like them have ever been seen alive and flying around by me or anyone else I know in New Jersey, let alone outside in my own yard. My daughter is petrified by them (I don't blame her) and is afraid to go outside. I did some Googling only to find reports of folks claiming to have caught Giant Japanese Hornets in their back yards in Pennsylvania --- again, a first time for many of them.

Does anyone know anything about this? All of their nests have been underground (about 6 - 8) and spraying the holes with Hornet spray does not seem to stop them from re-establishing the nest in a day or two.

That is likely a Cicada killer wasp.

Wikilink (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicada_killer_wasp)

They can be very large but are not very agressive. They are a native species as well.

Just thinking
6th September 2007, 08:40 AM
That sure looks like them, and their nest remains as well.

Hard to explain their non-aggressive nature to a small child, though. Funny how they are claimed as native yet I've never seen these guys before in my life.

Thanks for the info.

ponderingturtle
6th September 2007, 08:45 AM
That sure looks like them, and their nest remains as well.

Hard to explain their non-aggressive nature to a small child, though. Funny how they are claimed as native yet I've never seen these guys before in my life.

Thanks for the info.


They don't seem to be very common, we get them around the place I work every summer, they seem to have pretty specific areas that they like.

You could also try contacting Bug Girl. I am sure she knows more about this than I do.

madurobob
6th September 2007, 08:57 AM
That sure looks like them, and their nest remains as well.

Hard to explain their non-aggressive nature to a small child, though. Funny how they are claimed as native yet I've never seen these guys before in my life.

Thanks for the info.
Cicada killers won't hurt you, but can be scary. I've found that a tiny amount of Sevin dust sprinkled in (not on or around) the hole keeps them away for good. Works great on yellow jacket nests, too.

But, be careful w/Sevin since it can look like pollen on the ground and honey bees may be attracted to it. Don't use it if there are honey bee hives nearby.

madurobob
6th September 2007, 09:06 AM
That sure looks like them, and their nest remains as well.

Hard to explain their non-aggressive nature to a small child, though. Funny how they are claimed as native yet I've never seen these guys before in my life.

Thanks for the info.
Oh, and for the record, I've heard many people here in NC swear they've been attacked by "Japanese" hornets. I'm sure they are wrong as I don't think the Asian hornet is in NC (or NJ). We do have large European hornets that are scary to behold, but they are almost as docile as honey bees.

They can, however, sting multiple times. I was stung by one last year five times before I could brush it off - damn painful!

GT/CS
6th September 2007, 02:33 PM
Everything you've ever wanted to know about wasps. Some of those buggers are flat-out scary!

http://images.whatsthatbug.com/wasps.html

WildCat
6th September 2007, 04:41 PM
That is likely a Cicada killer wasp.

Wikilink (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicada_killer_wasp)

They can be very large but are not very agressive. They are a native species as well.
Oh, I've seen those here in Chicago and always wondered what species they were! They are absolute giants when you see them, don't bother you though like all the yellowjackets this time of year!

DangerousBeliefs
6th September 2007, 04:51 PM
We have Cicada killers all over the place around here.

I always knew they were relatively harmless but they are very scary when they fly by.

I did not know that they cannot bite and males have no stinger.

But you want to know what is truly scary? Try a Horsefly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsefly). They're as big as a half-dollar and if they bite you can take a nice chunk of flesh.

TX50
6th September 2007, 05:18 PM
But you want to know what is truly scary? Try a Horsefly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsefly). They're as big as a half-dollar and if they bite you can take a nice chunk of flesh.


We used to get eaten alive by those damn things on army exercises in
Scotland. Horrible! I still run away or take them out (I don't otherwise
summarily execute insects) if I see them today.

a_unique_person
6th September 2007, 05:21 PM
That sure looks like them, and their nest remains as well.

Hard to explain their non-aggressive nature to a small child, though. Funny how they are claimed as native yet I've never seen these guys before in my life.

Thanks for the info.

Global warming?

LibraryLady
6th September 2007, 05:27 PM
I had them in my lawn for a while. They were indeed scary looking, and one little boy down the street, who wandered over to see me, went screaming for his mama! However, they moved on after a year or two, and never seemed to bother anyone.

DRBUZZ0
7th September 2007, 05:56 PM
I've had wasps on my lawn a couple of times. It's horrible running over them with the lawnmower, as one time I got stung 16 times. Luckilly I'm not alergic or extremely sensitive to that sort of thing, but that time it did definitely ruin my whole day. Worst of all, I thought I was done getting stung, having run away, no doubt arms flailing like a fool, only to come inside and have one still in my t-shirt sting me on the back.

It's all in vain for them though, obviously the ones which stung me died, even if the barb doesn't stay they generally get destroyed. But does it save their nest?

No, like pearl harbor, their preemptive strike only seals the fate of their colony. I generally respond with a massive chemical weapons attack. If I don't have that, I'll just use incendiaries.

One time, I was so freakin pissed about being stung (despite the fact that they don't know what they're doing or have intent or anything), that I put on gloves/hat/mask and made a make-shift bee suit. It was imperfect, but I only needed to get close enough to dump a full 5 gallons of gasoline on the nest and light it with a blow tourch.


God I hate horseflies too. I've heard that people often go overboard with insectaside. My response is often "Okay, so you're saying that ten times the amount is *less* likely to kill them?" But whatever...


[note... there's some tongue in cheek humor here. I'm not actually that wacky, but I do not take kindly to stings]

ponderingturtle
7th September 2007, 06:55 PM
I've had wasps on my lawn a couple of times. It's horrible running over them with the lawnmower, as one time I got stung 16 times. Luckilly I'm not alergic or extremely sensitive to that sort of thing, but that time it did definitely ruin my whole day. Worst of all, I thought I was done getting stung, having run away, no doubt arms flailing like a fool, only to come inside and have one still in my t-shirt sting me on the back.

It's all in vain for them though, obviously the ones which stung me died, even if the barb doesn't stay they generally get destroyed. But does it save their nest?

Buzzo that bees, wasps can sting as many times as they need to and can if they get away have no reason to die any time soon(other than the general short life cycle of insects)

DRBUZZ0
7th September 2007, 07:37 PM
Buzzo that bees, wasps can sting as many times as they need to and can if they get away have no reason to die any time soon(other than the general short life cycle of insects)

Yeah, I couldn't remember. Some of them can sting multiple times, others the stinger gets ripped off, and others usually can sting multiple times, but on occasion it gets damage.

Wasps, Honey Bees, Bumble Bees, Hornets, Yellow Jackets, Bald-Wasps are apparently different. I'm not always sure I keep them straight, but in any case... I believe those were hornets, which IIRC don't have any kind of barb and pretty much never die from stinging... but eh... they died then

fuelair
7th September 2007, 09:44 PM
My rule is any sting, I hunt them down and kill all - fire, gasoline, boiling water (really good for ant mounds and no poison involved).

Just thinking
11th September 2007, 05:56 PM
My rule is any sting, I hunt them down and kill all - fire, gasoline, boiling water (really good for ant mounds and no poison involved).

Yes ... boiling water does work on ants, but I recall doing it to a large mound only to find it all built up the next day. Down went a pint of gasoline; no need to lite it --- none returned.