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Old 28th July 2014, 03:02 PM   #4681
Lennart Hyland
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I'm about halfway through Patrick O'Brian's Master And Commander, the first book in the Aubrey/Maturin series.

Its quite good so far! Though I've heard that book 2 and 3 are even better, so I'm looking forward to them.
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Old 28th July 2014, 03:53 PM   #4682
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Originally Posted by jimbob View Post
Did that spend a fair bit of time on Naval teams? I recall reading one (from the library) that did. It was a good book.
Not so much, if I recall; I think they get mentioned in passing, but it concentrates mostly on ordnance dropped on civilian locations. It also covered some of the issues with "turf wars" and information perhaps not being shared initially as much as it might have been.
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Old 28th July 2014, 07:38 PM   #4683
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Originally Posted by Lennart Hyland View Post
I'm about halfway through Patrick O'Brian's Master And Commander, the first book in the Aubrey/Maturin series.

Its quite good so far! Though I've heard that book 2 and 3 are even better, so I'm looking forward to them.
They're very addictive.
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Old 29th July 2014, 01:12 AM   #4684
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Currently reading the second Hunger Games novel. After that, I'm moving on to Cornerstone: Raising Rook by our own Tiktaalik.
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Old 29th July 2014, 04:13 AM   #4685
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I've been re-reading a bunch of Doctor Who Extended Universe books (and there are a lot of them, 300+) as part of a fan project to extended Who RPG to non-canon material.
Good grief, but there was some crap written.
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Old 29th July 2014, 06:44 AM   #4686
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3/4ths of the way through A Dance With Dragons. Then I'm all caught up like all the cool kids.
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Old 29th July 2014, 07:32 AM   #4687
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_Mr. Mercedes_ -- Stephen King

I don't think King is even a good writer -- if by good writer you mean someone with fresh perceptions, a great or interesting or original style, new or profound ideas, psychological or philosophical insight. He doesn't really have a way with words, and he doesn't even seem all that bright.

But I've read (or speed-read) most of his books. What keeps me coming back is his ability to rope you in. The most interesting part of most of his books is the beginning, where some personal character flaw or conflict begins to connect with something larger, something weird. Then there's usually a lot of running around in the middle and a big explosion at the end, which is not that interesting.

In the best books, there's a great aura of dread, which gives me a buzz.

In this one, though, the effect is like Scoobie Doo Meets Psycho. A rag-tag team defeats a monster with Mother issues.

He may be ringing some new changes on the detective novel here by defying some conventions, but the changes aren't interesting. They're stolidly in the service of popular appeal, of political appeal.

But heck, the man works hard and deserves his fifty (!) best-sellers. He doesn't need or deserve critical acclaim.

I'm a minor snob who sides with Harold Bloom.

Who would win? Stephen King or Paul de Man?
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Old 29th July 2014, 08:41 AM   #4688
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Deep: Freediving, renegade science, and what the ocean tells us about ourselves, by James Nestor, 2014.

In addition to describing his experiences learning to freedive, Nestor takes us on an exploration of various physiological conditions, on explanations of echolocation and other perceptual activities in animals and in humans (the latter not usually developed), and on the various levels of the oceans.

I'm about halfway through it and enjoying it.
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Old 29th July 2014, 09:53 AM   #4689
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Originally Posted by bruto View Post
Originally Posted by Lennart Hyland View Post
I'm about halfway through Patrick O'Brian's Master And Commander, the first book in the Aubrey/Maturin series.

Its quite good so far! Though I've heard that book 2 and 3 are even better, so I'm looking forward to them.
They're very addictive.
Id recommend a biography of Lord Cochrane

For example

Cochrane: Britannia's Sea Wolf

and you will see how many of the incidents were lifted out of his life (as Patrick O'Brian himself said)

ETA: Pretty accurate review on goodreads:

Quote:
I read Patrick O'Brien's Aubrey/Maturin series without realising just how much O'Brien drew inspiration from real-life events. The two major points in Cochrane's life - his defeat of the Gamo by his ship, HMS Speedy, and the Stock Exchange fraud trial of 1814 - are both pivotal events in the life Jack Aubrey. Whereas O'Brien has the luxury of a fictional narrative and poetic licence to help tell the tale, Donald Thomas is confined to the facts. Nonetheless he still manages to convey all the excitement of Cochrane's many naval engagements and adventures. He also uses that flair to tell the story of Cochrane's political triumphs to great effect. It is difficult to understand why Cochrane is not held in the same regard as Nelson or Wellington and Thomas does go some way to try and use Cochrane's antagonism of the British establishment as a possible explanation. I think that those of us who are richly educated and entertained by this book and its ilk - whether fact or fiction - now owe Thomas Cochrane a duty to honour his memory and this small contribution is where I start.(less)
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UK 9.4% of GDP of which 82.8% is state expenditure = 7.8% of GDP from taxes
US 17.7% of GDP of which 47.2% is state expenditure = 8.5% of GDP from taxes

Last edited by jimbob; 29th July 2014 at 09:55 AM.
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Old 30th July 2014, 03:14 PM   #4690
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Thanks for the tip Jimbob, that sounds very interesting. Though I have 20 books still to read in the Aubrey/Maturin series
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Old 30th July 2014, 06:21 PM   #4691
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Almost tree-quarter of the way through Evolution- The Human Story by Dr. Alice Roberts, a great coffee-table book with lost of information and beautiful full-page images of skeletons, reconstructions and other goodies.
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Old 31st July 2014, 10:45 AM   #4692
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Originally Posted by Lennart Hyland View Post
Thanks for the tip Jimbob, that sounds very interesting. Though I have 20 books still to read in the Aubrey/Maturin series
Some examples I can recall from that book. When the Speedy captured the Spanish Xebec Frigate, because Speedy only lost two men out of the crew of 50 (as opposed to the 300 of the Spanish frigate), the authorities decided that the opposition was obviously not of sufficient calibre to merit significant recognition.

Or this From the book:

Quote:
The lack of response from the Admiralty, and indeed, the deprivation of prize-money meant that all of Cochrane’s efforts during the siege were at his own cost, excepting the expenditure of ammunition. To make matters worse, in reply to Lord Collingwood’s account of the action at Fort Trinity the authorities sent a reprimand to Cochrane for his excessive use of ‘powder and shot.’ Furthermore, they had an evident dislike of his excessive use of the Imperieuse, which was apt to require more in repairs and maintenance than ships which kept out of harms way. This ludicrous remark rightly infuriated Cochrane who bitterly observed that captains who avoided combat and brought ships home unblemished were rewarded with pensions. Cochrane continues; ’‘a strange contrast to some of the costly expeditions of the period for less results, and one which ought to have secured for me anything but the political animosity with which all my services were regarded”.
Cochrane himself received nothing for thirty years until at length he was granted the ordinary good service pension. Hardly a fitting tribute for even a captain.
This was in holding up the French advance on land by using his ffrigate to support Fort Trinidad.
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OECD healthcare spending

http://www.oecd.org/els/health-syste...uesteddata.htmlink is 2013 data (2011 Data below):
UK 9.4% of GDP of which 82.8% is state expenditure = 7.8% of GDP from taxes
US 17.7% of GDP of which 47.2% is state expenditure = 8.5% of GDP from taxes
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Old 1st August 2014, 03:47 AM   #4693
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George Mann's Engines of War, an anthology of War Doctor (i.e. Doctor Who 8.5) stories. That's the Mann of the Newbury and Hobbes stories.
Shimmin Graeme's A Kill in the Morning. An interesting alternate history based on the lengthy James Bond versus Nazis fan-fic he posted to AH.com five years ago (but don't hold that against him/it, Fifty Shades it's not).
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Old 1st August 2014, 05:58 AM   #4694
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Does listening to audiobooks count?

I haven't read a book in over 10 years. I only read articles or short stories. I find that looking at the letters and words distract me from trying to imagine what they actually mean. I can do this for a short while, but after about 4 or 5 pages I'm exhausted. A shame really, because I always loved to read books when I was young, and imagining the world and characters created by the writer.

A friend of mine told me he was listening to audiobooks and that it might be a good idea for me to try it. I started listening to "A Game of Thrones" the first in the "A Song of Ice and Fire" books by George R.R. Martin about 2 weeks ago (I love the TV series). I'm averaging about 5 or 6 chapters a day and I really love it. At first, I had to really concentrate to follow everything, but now I'm accustomed to the (great) narration by Roy Dotrice, I can even listen and follow the story while doing other things, like household activities or even playing the guitar (not to loudly obviously).

I'm so glad I discovered this way to "read" books and I can't wait to try other books as well (apart from the other books in the Ice & Fire series of course).
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Old 1st August 2014, 03:55 PM   #4695
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Started a Reread of "The Guns Of August" by Barbara Tuchman today,because of the centennial of the start of World War One.
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Old 1st August 2014, 09:35 PM   #4696
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Originally Posted by dudalb View Post
Started a Reread of "The Guns Of August" by Barbara Tuchman today,because of the centennial of the start of World War One.

If you have not done so, also try Tuchman's The Proud Tower.
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Old 4th August 2014, 09:05 AM   #4697
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_Signs of the Times -- Deconstruction and the Fall of Paul de Man__ by David Lehman

As Lehman says, the ferocity of an academic debate is often inversely proportional to the actual material stakes.

I've noticed that this fight, amongst a few academics, seems rather nasty. The reviews of this book, and of another recent biography of de Man, seem polarized between 1 and 5 stars on Amazon.

On one side you have people calling Paul de Man a sociopath and a fascist.

On the other side, he was revered as a kind, quiet, hard-working teacher and a good listener -- and considered a visionary. His critics are tabloid journalists who understand nothing, supposedly.

The evidence is clear: He was certainly a scoundrel and an opportunist, and he wrote anti-Semitic articles for a Nazi-sponsored magazine in Belgium during the war, when he was in his early twenties. He embezzled money, lied, and lived as a sort of bigamist. He left his first family, it seems, partly because having an American wife would improve his immigration status.

However, every scoundrel who lacks any kind of integrity -- intellectual or moral -- is not a sociopath. A sociopath behaves consistently badly, and can't form attachments.

It seems, rather, that Paul de Man grew up, and suppressed his early adventures and alliances with the Nazis.

For balance, I've tried to read his essays on Nietzsche and Proust -- because I've read those two writers pretty thoroughly. I can't understand a single sentence, or even the general point, of de Man's essays.

It's hard for me -- being an amateur -- to tell what contributes most to the difficulty of his writing: Is he really saying such subtle things? Is it the French manner? Is it willful obscurantism? Sheer intimidation, or intellectual armor?

It seems that very little of substance is really being debated. One thing's for sure, his essays are no help at all if you want to understand Proust or Nietzsche better.

I notice, for instance, that de Man concentrates on one of Nietzsche's earliest -- and far from best -- books, _The Birth of Tragedy_.

The Lehman book is slightly annoying, because of some poetic license, some free association, but it's mostly pretty clear, and interesting.

One of my best friends, who attended Yale in the 80's, said he left Yale and the study of literature, because of the decadence and craziness at that time. (He objected to the study of de Sade and of comic books) I wonder if things have changed for the better, or not. Probably not.
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Old 4th August 2014, 11:29 AM   #4698
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Just finished After Me Comes The Flood by Sarah Perry, who is a friend of brodski's and mine. She's getting some very good reviews for it:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/201...h-perry-review
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/b...ew-talent.html

About to read a book written by another friend of mine, Emma Mooney, A Beautiful Game.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/1909...&robot_redir=1

My cousin has just got herself a literary agent too, and Im starting to feel like I should write something so as not to feel left out....
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Old 10th August 2014, 06:21 AM   #4699
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Heh. Carl Hoffman can write. He can write a helluva yarn, that is.

_Savage Harvest_ -- A Tale of Cannibals, Colonialism, and Michael Rockefeller's Tragic Quest for Primitive Art_ -- by Carl Hoffman

Quote:
As Hoffman tells it, minutes after washing up at the mouth of the Ewta River, Rockefeller is attacked by a band of Asmat warriors. The assailants spear the intruder through his rib cage and, “with one blow of an ax in the back of his neck,” murder him. Then they butcher the body, cutting off his arms and legs and pulling out his entrails “with a vigorous jerk.” The pieces of meat are set in a hot fire to roast.

This grisly scene turns out to be entirely hypothetical, drawn from a 1959 article about Asmat rituals in American Anthropologist magazine. Why include it? “If they’d killed Michael,” Hoffman argues, “that was how it had been done.”

Hoffman’s sensational speculation risks losing his readers’ trust right off the bat. Quickly, however, his book settles down and his reporting takes hold, drawing a vivid portrait of the world of the Asmat people, hunter-gatherers who lived in isolation until the mid-20th century.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/06/bo...fman.html?_r=0

Hoffman does visit the area, and talks to some of the tribal elders -- who, he claims, come very close to admitting that some of their men killed Rockefeller. They did, at least, have motive, means, opportunity.

This is more solid than the quest for the historical Jesus, but the whole book is a tease. You approach the most important evidence after hundreds of pages, and it turns out to come from some of the Dutch missionaries who lived there at the time.

Reminds me of that great line from The Simpsons:

Judge: Mr. Hutz w’ve been in here for four hours. Do you have any evidence at all?
Hutz: Well, Your Honor. We’ve plenty of hearsay and conjecture. Those are kinds of evidence.
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Old 12th August 2014, 12:00 PM   #4700
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_Here Comes Everybody -- The Story of the Pogues _ -- James Fearnley

I come to this party pretty late. In the 80's I was too uptight and earnest to appreciate The Pogues.

Excellent book.

Shane MacGowen was already a wreck before he was famous, but somehow he managed to write a lot of brilliant lyrics. He wasn't competent as a musician, really -- could barely play two simple chords on the guitar.

Fortunately, it's too late for me to learn from his example.

How can you not love this?


Quote:
I like to walk in the summer breeze
Down Dalling Road by the dead old trees
And drink with my friends
In the Hammersmith Broadway
Dear dirty delightful old drunken old days

Then the winter came down and I loved it so dearly
The pubs and the bookies where you'd spend all your time
And the old men that were singing
When the roses bloom again
And turn like the leaves
To a new summertime

Now the winter comes down
I can't stand the chill
That comes to the streets around Christmas time
And I'm buggered to damnation
And I haven't got a penny
To wander the dark streets of London

Every time that I look on the first day of summer
Takes me back to the place where they gave ECT
And the drugged up psychos
With death in their eyes
And how all of this really
Means nothing to me
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Old 13th August 2014, 04:56 AM   #4701
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My current pile.
J. K. Rowling's Dumbledores's Army Reunites at Quidditch World Cup Final. Will the saga ever really end?

Jack Rinella: Becoming a Slave, The Theory & Practice of Voluntary Servitude

Patrick Turner: Serial Killer Doctors. Interesting, especially the coverage of Bodkin Adams.

Gordon Kerr: College Killers- School Shootings in North America and Europe

Geoffrey Canada: Fist Stick Knife Gun - A Personal History of Violence

John McWhorter: Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue- The Untold History of English. Fascinating

Laura Antoniou - Cinema Erotica

Agatha Christie - Hercule Poirot and the Greenshoe Folly. Her abandoned novella (which partly became Dead Man’s Folly) now published.

Jesse Bering: Perv- The Sexual Deviant in All of Us

Robin Gardiner: The Great Titanic Conspiracy- Cover-Ups and Mysteries of the World's Most Famous Sea Disaster. Some research for a time-travel RPG scenario on the doomed ship.

Kathryn Joyce: Quiverfull - Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement. Stross was right about those nuts.

Witold Rybczynski: One Good Turn- A Natural History of the Screwdriver and the Screw. Surprisingly fascinating.

Jim Wilson: Nazi Princess- Hitler, Lord Rothermere and Princess Stephanie von Hohenlohe. More RPG research.

Michael McGuire: Believing- The Neuroscience of Fantasies, Fears, and Convictions. Can religion and other delusions be explained purely by neurosciences? Can they be fixed?

Paul Doherty: Isabella and the Strange Death of Edward II. Part research and part pleasure, Dr. Doherty's non-fiction is as good as his novels.

Douglas Botting: Gerald Durrell- The Authorised Biography. I read and enjoyed a lot of Durrell in my teen years so I grabbed the bio.

S. T. Joshi: I Am Providence - The Life and Times of H. P. Lovecraft

David R. Montgomery: The Rocks Don't Lie- A Geologist Investigates Noah's Flood. A brief summary; the flood didn't happen.

Raven A. Nuckols: Had the Queen Lived- An Alternative History of Anne Boleyn

Tim Hanley: Wonder Woman Unbound- The Curious History of the World's Most Famous Heroine. More bondage and sexual deviancy...
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As human right is always something given, it always in reality reduces to the right which men give, "concede," to each other. If the right to existence is conceded to new-born children, then they have the right; if it is not conceded to them, as was the case among the Spartans and ancient Romans, then they do not have it. For only society can give or concede it to them; they themselves cannot take it, or give it to themselves.
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Old 13th August 2014, 08:22 AM   #4702
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Originally Posted by catsmate1 View Post
My current pile. <and a very large snip>

Your lists always give me lots of things to put on my lists.

Thanks for that.
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Old 13th August 2014, 09:30 AM   #4703
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
Your lists always give me lots of things to put on my lists.

Thanks for that.
Thank you. If I can help more please let me know.
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As human right is always something given, it always in reality reduces to the right which men give, "concede," to each other. If the right to existence is conceded to new-born children, then they have the right; if it is not conceded to them, as was the case among the Spartans and ancient Romans, then they do not have it. For only society can give or concede it to them; they themselves cannot take it, or give it to themselves.
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Old 13th August 2014, 03:40 PM   #4704
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Originally Posted by Lennart Hyland View Post
I'm about halfway through Patrick O'Brian's Master And Commander, the first book in the Aubrey/Maturin series.

Its quite good so far! Though I've heard that book 2 and 3 are even better, so I'm looking forward to them.

Oh dear, oh dear. You've got the habit then. There is no such thing as reading "Just One" or even two or three of the Aubrey/Maturin series. Or reading them just once.

I'm reading "Extreme Cosmos" by Bryan Gaensler - a young astrophysicist with the most lucid writing about cosmology I've come across. Published in 2011 so probably a few light years out of date. I had downloaded a podcast by him and was thrilled to see this book on display in the local library.
http://www.amazon.com/Extreme-Cosmos.../dp/0399537511

Also "Lying" by Sam Harris - a long and persuasive essay which describes the harm done by the sorts of white lies we (well, I) usually justify.
http://www.amazon.com/Lying-Sam-Harris/dp/1940051002


Alan Rusbridger's "Play it Again: an amateur against the impossible." The Editor-in-Chief of The Guardian set himself an almost impossible task: to learn, in the space of a year, Chopin's Ballade No. 1 (a piece that inspires dread in many professional pianists).
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/0099554747
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Old 13th August 2014, 03:58 PM   #4705
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Meant to tell you that I enjoyed this:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/p...with-Amis.html
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Old 14th August 2014, 04:56 AM   #4706
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_Trapped Under the Sea_ -- Neil Swidey

A book about an entirely preventable accident, and its aftermath. Well-written.

No, the situation doesn't have the poetry of _The Perfect Storm_.
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Old 14th August 2014, 07:08 AM   #4707
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_The Empathy Exams: Essays by Leslie Jamison_

I can't. Empathize with her or her writing, that is.

I'm sorry to leave youth behind, but not its foolishness.

A more-engaged review, here:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/201...jamison-review

from that otherwise positive review:

Quote:
The more instructive exemplars for the kind of essayism Jamison wants to practice are Joan Didion and Janet Malcolm, whom she either cites or passingly invokes, though neither is notably "empathetic" and probably the better for it.
I'm trying to figure out for myself why I enjoy those writers, and why I can't really stand Jamison. Maybe there's a principle involved, or maybe it's the crazy family I grew up in. Don't want to go anywhere near your pain -- after that.

If you could read people's minds, your head would quickly explode. Why care about one person or one thing over another? For me, that's more than a rhetorical question. I'm really asking myself this.
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Old 18th August 2014, 09:53 AM   #4708
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Reading the Outlaws by W.E.B. Griffin.



Book VI in THE PRESIDENTIAL AGENT series
by W.E.B. Griffin
and William E. Butterworth IV

Published 28 December 2010.
Things are not exactly what they used to be for Charley Castillo. The former Presidential Agent’s Office of Organizational Analysis has been disbanded, he and his colleagues have been abruptly retired, and the sudden death of the President has brought a much more unsympathetic commander-in-chief into the Oval Office.
“Just how many bodies did this Castillo leave scattered all over the world?” the President asked.
“I really don’t know, Mr. President.”
“You’re the Director of National Intelligence!” the President snapped. “Shouldn’t you know a little detail like that?”
But just because Castillo is out of the government doesn’t mean he’s out of business. As experience has very painfully demonstrated to him, there are a number of things that the intelligence community can’t do, won’t do, or doesn’t do well, and he has the men and assets to help set things straight.
But the first opportunity, when it comes, is shocking: A barrel marked BIOLOGICAL HAZARD from an anonymous shipper arrives at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute at Fort Detrick, Maryland.
The barrel contains some of the most dangerous biohazard material on earth — all of which was supposed to have been destroyed during a raid orchestrated by Castillo on a secret Russian factory in the Congo.
Clearly, the message is that more of the deadly material remains, but who has it and what do they want? With lives at stake — possibly if not probably his own included — Castillo’s gut feeling is that he’s not going to like the answers one damn bit . . . .
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Old 18th August 2014, 12:46 PM   #4709
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The Wonders of Water by Gaston Tissandier
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Old 20th August 2014, 06:58 AM   #4710
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A year ago, I suggested the quality of the writing in Craig Johnson's Sheriff Longmire mysteries "justifies comparison to Hammett, Chandler, Ross Macdonald, John D MacDonald, Sue Grafton, and other luminaries of this genre." Now that I've finished the first seven of those novels, it's time for that comparison.

Johnson's been averaging one Longmire novel per year. Dashiell Hammett wrote many short stories, but only five novels. Raymond Chandler completed only seven. Of Craig Johnson's first seven, I'd say two are as good as Chandler's two best but not quite as good as Hammett's two best. None are as weak as Chandler's or Hammett's worst. The weakest of Johnson's first seven Longmire novels is on par with Robert B Parker's best Spenser novels.

As with Sue Grafton's Kinsey Millhone series, time moves slower in the fictional universe. Johnson's first seven novels, which cover seven years of publishing, cover a year and a half of Sheriff Longmire's life.


Reading those books within a single year, I began to notice the body count, which would be easier to overlook in a series set in densely populated California, Florida, Chicago, New York, or Boston. Johnson's Longmire series is set in Wyoming, where the number of real-world homicides rarely exceeds 20 per year and is often a single digit. You'd expect most to occur within Wyoming's population centers, but quite a few have been depopulating Sheriff Longmire's already sparsely populated Absaroka County.


Johnson challenges readers with flashbacks, dream sequences, literary allusions, and a first-person narrative whose reliability may be compromised by ethanol, dehydration, hypoxia, hypothermia, concussion, or plain old wishful thinking:
Quote:
"You believe that stuff?"

I was just as glad that he hadn't been privy to my experiences in this very area of the mountains more than a year ago, when I had seen and heard my share of strange things. "I believe there were spiritual signposts that these tribes put into place so that no matter how dire the situation, the members would never be tempted to do things the tribe considered absolutely taboo." I felt tired and slouched into the seat. "Imagine beginning to see people, things that no one else can see, and in punishment the real people around you begin drawing away—leaving you to these...spirits."

"Isn't that kind of like pitting the monsters of your imagination against the monsters of human nature?"

I smiled. "You have been reading your Dante." I stared out the side window and wasn't smiling when I made the next statement. "Wonder who would win."
That's a key passage from early in Johnson's ambitious seventh novel, Hell is Empty. (Its title comes from Shakespeare's The Tempest.) This conversation refers to events of the first Longmire novel (The Cold Dish), asks the central questions that make this novel more than a murder mystery, and warns readers who haven't been reading their Dante they might want to see what Wikipedia has to say about the Inferno before reading further.
Quote:
I stood and was a little uneasy, feeling confused and angry. "When I carried Henry and this kid off the mountain, I was dehydrated, hypothermic, concussed..."

"Like now?"

I bit my lip but could hardly feel it, remembered the balaclava and pulled it up over my nose. "Worse; a lot worse."

He laughed. "Well, the evening is young."
I had the odd experience of reading this novel just two weeks before I embarked upon a long-planned trek through the area of its main action.

Quote:
"They have left the trail and are now going across Paint Rock Creek."

"Then what?"

"Up"


Those falls are at an elevation of about 10,000 feet. The summit, which cannot be seen in this photograph, is about 3000 feet higher.


Ross Macdonald is often regarded as master of the psychological detective novel because his protagonist Lew Archer recommended psychotherapy to clients and solved cases by exploring the emotional and family histories of victims and suspects.

Craig Johnson's folksy Sheriff Walt Longmire often distrusts his own self-analysis and tries to solve cases while treating people fairly. As an officer of the law, his professional obligation to pursue justice without interfering with the free lives of citizens provides much of the conflict, and much of the rest comes from his desire to favor friends, family, and voters without giving special favors. In my opinion, the Longmire novels offer more philosophical and psychological depth than Ross Macdonald's novels.
Quote:
"And the moral of the story is?"

"What is it with you white people and morals? Maybe it's just a story about what happened."
Hammett's Continental Op told you what happened. Johnson tells stories about what happened.

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Old 20th August 2014, 01:37 PM   #4711
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I usually read to be in touch with a mind I admire, more than I read for the subject matter.

_Stringer_ is great.

Anjan Sundaram decides he's sick of the study of mathematics at Yale, and wants to be in touch with the real world. So he becomes a rookie reporter in the Congo, and experiences various misadventures.

I'm only half-way through, but I really like it so far.

(He could be completely misinforming me about the Congo, for all I know.)
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Old 27th August 2014, 09:09 AM   #4712
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Originally Posted by jenspen View Post
Oh dear, oh dear. You've got the habit then. There is no such thing as reading "Just One" or even two or three of the Aubrey/Maturin series. Or reading them just once.
[/url]
Haha well I just finished the second one Post Captain quite good but not like the first.

I absolutly want to continue on this series and start with the third book but I recently went by a pocketbook store and found a nice copy of 1984 by George Orwell. But we'll see, I guess I'm gonna rush through 1984 since I already miss Captain Jack Aubrey and Doctor Stephen Maturin
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Old 27th August 2014, 01:03 PM   #4713
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I read Master and Commander about 1985, and Post Captain a few years later.

I prefer C. S. Forester's Hornblower series.
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