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Tags favorite books , recommended books

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Old 8th September 2014, 04:00 PM   #4721
Brainster
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I've been breezing through the Parker novels by Richard Stark (aka Donald Westlake). They're like potato chips--once you start, it's very hard to stop. Got introduced to them by Darwyn Cooke's excellent graphic novel adaptations.
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Old 8th September 2014, 06:06 PM   #4722
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Paper:

Just finished:

Kearney's March, a misleading title indeed, although the subtitle: The epic creation of the American West, 1846-1847, is more accurate. The author, Winston Groom, is according to the dust jacket, "the author of fifteen previous books." I had never heard of him. He chronicles not only Kearney's march, but Fremont's travels and subsequent history, Doniphan's march toward Chihuahua, Santa Anna's various treacheries, President Polk's problems with Fremont's father-in-law, etc. And also the Donner tragedy.

One minor gripe with his book: His bibliograpy is extensive, but he quotes people without attribution. This is actually a strange complaint for me, because I don't like flipping to endnotes constantly when they're only page references, but I want the references when I want 'em.

Another aside: One of the books in the bibliography is Robert Leckie's Sea to Shining Sea. Leckie was mentioned earlier in this thread.

Waiting:

The Secret Life of Pronouns by James Pennybaker, Chair of the Department of Psychology at U Texas Austin.

A More Perfect Heaven (Dava Sobel), about Copernicus. Sobel is a fine writer.

The Man who Found the Missing Link: Eugene Dubois and his lifelong quest to prove Darwin right, by Pat(tricia) Shipman.

A science-fiction book by Spider Robinson

Several mysteries.


On my new tablet, for reading in waiting rooms, etc.:

Two Little Savages by (Ernest Thompson Seton.

Mansfield Park and Emma, both by Jane Austen. The latter is a most amusing book.

The Jungle Bookby Rudyard Kipling, which I somehow missed reading when I was a kid.
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Old 13th September 2014, 12:51 AM   #4723
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post
On my new tablet, for reading in waiting rooms, etc.:
Oh! I hadn't thought of that! Excellent idea, xterra!
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Old 13th September 2014, 08:46 PM   #4724
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Originally Posted by xterra View Post



Mansfield Park and Emma, both by Jane Austen. The latter is a most amusing book.
I can't resist telling anybody, interested or not, that Jane Austen's "Emma" is my absolute, all-time favourite novel. It not only has the perfect ending but is also so psychologically acute, lucid, elegant, ironic, witty and beautifully organised that I enjoy it more with every reading. Famously described as "the Parthenon of fiction."

I've been re-reading some Reginald Hill mysteries to wind down at night. The one I'm enjoying most is in the series featuring the short, bald, black, hapless PI from Luton, Joe Sixsmith - "The Roar of the Butterflies". Some clever metaphors. (BTW, "Emma" was Hill's favourite novel too).

For still more relaxing entertainment I've been chuckling my way through a very nice Librivox reading of an early P. G. Wodehouse, The Adventures of Sally:
https://librivox.org/the-adventures-...p-g-wodehouse/

I'm about to return to the library, mostly unread, Jordan Ellenberg's "How not to be Wrong: the hidden maths of everyday life". It's 460 odd pages and a project for another time. Perhaps.
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