JREF Homepage Swift Blog Events Calendar $1 Million Paranormal Challenge The Amaz!ng Meeting Useful Links Support Us
James Randi Educational Foundation JREF Forum
Forum Index Register Members List Events Mark Forums Read Help

Go Back   JREF Forum » General Topics » Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Technology
Click Here To Donate

Notices


Welcome to the JREF Forum, where we discuss skepticism, critical thinking, the paranormal and science in a friendly but lively way. You are currently viewing the forum as a guest, which means you are missing out on discussing matters that are of interest to you. Please consider registering so you can gain full use of the forum features and interact with other Members. Registration is simple, fast and free! Click here to register today.

Tags bird watching , birders , birds , ornithology

Reply
Old 22nd June 2012, 09:23 AM   #161
jasonpatterson
Philanthropic Misanthrope
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Space, The Final Frontier
Posts: 2,373
Originally Posted by Humanzee View Post
The yellow and the beak sure throw me off if that is a House Finch. However, I am truly unexperienced and shouldnt de-lurk to comment. Hopefully it will be back for a glamour shot.

...

Orange-crowned Warbler, Sauvie Island, OR. First time that I, on hearing a song, knew there was a bird I hadn't seen before and I needed to find it. Snapped this crummy shot.

I'll fess up to using I-Bird to ID the song.
Agreed that it's definitely not a house finch, though I wouldn't have been able to ID it myself without digging through a guide. Summer tanager looks right to me.

I can remember the first time I heard a mystery song. It was a really good feeling, because on top of realizing that there was a new bird nearby (or at least potentially a new bird), I found out that I had learned enough songs to know the everyday birds as well. Grats on the ID!
__________________
Sandra's seen a leprechaun, Eddie touched a troll, Laurie danced with witches once, Charlie found some goblins' gold.
Donald heard a mermaid sing, Susie spied an elf, But all the magic I have known I've had to make myself.
- Shel Silverstein
jasonpatterson is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 23rd June 2012, 02:05 PM   #162
NoahFence
Psycho Kitty
 
NoahFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Patriot Nation
Posts: 11,400
LOL....

BABY TURKEY!!

We saw the big turkey, and I'm all - hey, there's a bunch of sparrows there with her!

doh!




The non-zoomed pic:

__________________
Our truest life is when we are in our dreams awake.

-Henry David Thoreau

Last edited by NoahFence; 23rd June 2012 at 02:10 PM.
NoahFence is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 23rd June 2012, 02:08 PM   #163
NoahFence
Psycho Kitty
 
NoahFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Patriot Nation
Posts: 11,400
Originally Posted by jasonpatterson View Post
Agreed that it's definitely not a house finch, though I wouldn't have been able to ID it myself without digging through a guide. Summer tanager looks right to me.

I can remember the first time I heard a mystery song. It was a really good feeling, because on top of realizing that there was a new bird nearby (or at least potentially a new bird), I found out that I had learned enough songs to know the everyday birds as well. Grats on the ID!
I put it on ebird.com and sent the photo to some folks at Cornell, who positively ID'd it as an immature Summer Tanager. Pretty rare around here but not unheard of like when there was a Crested Caracara down the street.
__________________
Our truest life is when we are in our dreams awake.

-Henry David Thoreau
NoahFence is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 30th June 2012, 10:40 PM   #164
Humanzee
Muse
 
Humanzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 533
Two adult and two immature Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis) at Conboy Lake NWR, WA today. Too far away to photograph unfortunately (so no cool Baby shot)

Also 6 Pygmy Nuthatch (Sitta pygmaea). A new bird for me. Two were tending a nest. Sorry for the poor quality shot.

Humanzee is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 1st July 2012, 09:44 AM   #165
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
I'm a little behind in going through old photo sets, so these aren't actually from 2012 . . . but I'm posting them in 2012.

My mother's back patio is very popular with the birds in the winter, probably because she regularly tosses bird seed onto the snow. The birds are pretty hungry, so if bundle up and sit still, I can get some pretty close shots before I get too cold.


Pensive Blue Jay

Last year I went to St. Louis on a business trip (actually, I think I went twice) and of course I took the camera. The robin was hopping around in a vacant field next to the hotel:



American Robin Portrait


While on that trip, I spent an overcast afternoon wandering around Forest Park in St. Louis, MO. IMO, this was the best of the pictures:


Mockingbird Portrait
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt

Last edited by dasmiller; 1st July 2012 at 10:42 AM.
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 1st July 2012, 08:51 PM   #166
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
Ruby Throated Hummingbird I shot today near Peoria, Illinois...

YouTube Video This video is not hosted by the JREF. The JREF can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website.
I AGREE

He likes to drink from the small feeder, and between drinks he takes a rest on the larger, dish shaped feeder. He doesn't even realize there's plenty of sugar water right there under his tiny feet!
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2012, 04:45 AM   #167
ParrotPirate
Graduate Poster
 
ParrotPirate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Here,now
Posts: 1,580
I'm not what I would call a serious birder. I like birds, finches and cardinals are favorites. I like watching hawks and other raptors, too. I saw something yesterday that I've never seen before, and need some help with identification. I watched a smallish hawk-like bird "hover" by rapid wing flapping rather than "gliding on thermals. It was fairly low, too. It was late in the day, so visibility was very poor, couldn't get a good look at color/markings. I was in south-eastern Wisconsin at the time. (Waukesha, near the airport.) The best guess I can come up with is a broad-winged hawk, but that seem a bit large.
ParrotPirate is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2012, 06:51 AM   #168
NoahFence
Psycho Kitty
 
NoahFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Patriot Nation
Posts: 11,400
The hovering would suggest to me a smaller falcon type bird. Maybe an American Kestrel?
__________________
Our truest life is when we are in our dreams awake.

-Henry David Thoreau
NoahFence is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2012, 07:06 AM   #169
ParrotPirate
Graduate Poster
 
ParrotPirate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Here,now
Posts: 1,580
The more I think about it, the Kestrel seems like it might be right. I thought at first it was too big. Range seems wrong to be a harrier or Swainsons hawk. It was to my west, with setting sun behind, and I was on the lowest ground in the area, so I couldn't really make out markings or anything, and it didn't call, that I heard. It was right at my work-place, so I hope to see it again and nail down a solid identification.
ParrotPirate is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2012, 09:25 AM   #170
NoahFence
Psycho Kitty
 
NoahFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Patriot Nation
Posts: 11,400
The American Kestrel is what got me into birds in my mid-teens. I was walking around a park, and saw one hovering. Then it got the critter it was looking for, and went to a tree to eat. When it perched I saw the coloring and it was just amazing.

YouTube Video This video is not hosted by the JREF. The JREF can not be held responsible for the suitability or legality of this material. By clicking the link below you agree to view content from an external website.
I AGREE


Sorta like that?
__________________
Our truest life is when we are in our dreams awake.

-Henry David Thoreau
NoahFence is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2012, 11:07 AM   #171
ParrotPirate
Graduate Poster
 
ParrotPirate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Here,now
Posts: 1,580
BINGO! That is exactly what it was doing. Now I hope I can see it in better light and maybe get some pictures. (In my previous post, I meant I thought the bird I saw was too big to be a kestrel, but I think you're right on.)

Last edited by ParrotPirate; 4th July 2012 at 11:08 AM.
ParrotPirate is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2012, 12:08 PM   #172
Jeff Corey
New York Skeptic
 
Jeff Corey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 13,797
Does birdilstening count? I've heard these recently:



And there's an owl in back that I heard last night, again.
Jeff Corey is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th July 2012, 01:36 PM   #173
ParrotPirate
Graduate Poster
 
ParrotPirate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Here,now
Posts: 1,580
Took my kayak out this morning. Found a pelican rookery, a great blue heron rookery, saw several cormorants,ducks and gulls.
ParrotPirate is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 14th July 2012, 02:27 PM   #174
NoahFence
Psycho Kitty
 
NoahFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Patriot Nation
Posts: 11,400
__________________
Our truest life is when we are in our dreams awake.

-Henry David Thoreau
NoahFence is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 14th July 2012, 09:04 PM   #175
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
I'm not positive that it was a Heermann's. It was an unusually dark gull, but I couldn't get near it; the pictures I took were backlit so it's hard to judge the beak colors. Going through Sibley's, the Heermann's gull looked like the most likely match, and I am in their range, so I can make a decent case for it, but I can't be certain like I am for most of the others.
Well, this time I can confirm it. I was at Venice Beach today, and there were a lot of Heermann's gulls around. This time the lighting was just fine, as long as you were looking down:



On the pier, there was a pelican tame enough that people were posing with him. Well, near him, anyway; I think everyone stayed at least 1 meter from him, largely because his bill is about that long.


Unshy pelican (on Flickr)
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 17th July 2012, 11:24 PM   #176
Humanzee
Muse
 
Humanzee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 533
Is that a Rose-breasted Grossbeak, NoahFence?

Nice photos dasmiller.

Saw Chestnut-sided Warbler (Dendroica pensylcanica) near Sisters, Oregon. A rare bird for us north-westerners and was pretty exciting.

(crappy panicky photo not posted)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Chestnut-sided Warbler 2.jpg (82.0 KB, 0 views)

Last edited by Humanzee; 17th July 2012 at 11:25 PM. Reason: removed crappy image
Humanzee is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th July 2012, 04:06 PM   #177
quarky
Banned
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 20,454
I haven't seen a Baltimore Oriole in 20 years. They seem to have vanished from this area, as have scarlet tanagers. I'm in the Northern foothills of the Cumberland Plateau.
Any of you folks seeing them?
quarky is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th July 2012, 07:37 PM   #178
bruto
Penultimate Amazing
 
bruto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: way way north of Diddy Wah Diddy
Posts: 13,098
Originally Posted by quarky View Post
I haven't seen a Baltimore Oriole in 20 years. They seem to have vanished from this area, as have scarlet tanagers. I'm in the Northern foothills of the Cumberland Plateau.
Any of you folks seeing them?
We still get them with some frequency here in Western Vermont. Not as abundant as many birds, but we see a few every year without looking too hard.

Alas, not much else in the interesting bird realm this year. We did see a nice eagle in flight, but that's about the best of it, not helped by some visual compromise on my part. I can usually see if I notice a bird, but can't scan as I used to.
__________________
"Sir, I have found you an argument; but I am not obliged to find you an understanding.(Samuel Johnson)

I love this world, but not for its answers. (Mary Oliver)
bruto is online now   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th July 2012, 09:13 PM   #179
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
Originally Posted by quarky View Post
I haven't seen a Baltimore Oriole in 20 years. They seem to have vanished from this area, as have scarlet tanagers. I'm in the Northern foothills of the Cumberland Plateau.
Any of you folks seeing them?

We usually see at a couple Baltimore Orioles each year here in central Illinois. I never have seen many of them, but they don't seem any less common recently than they have most of my 3 or 4 decades of birdwatching.
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 23rd July 2012, 09:04 PM   #180
jasonpatterson
Philanthropic Misanthrope
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Space, The Final Frontier
Posts: 2,373
Originally Posted by quarky View Post
I haven't seen a Baltimore Oriole in 20 years. They seem to have vanished from this area, as have scarlet tanagers. I'm in the Northern foothills of the Cumberland Plateau.
Any of you folks seeing them?
I see them occasionally in NE Ohio. Not often, but once or twice a year. I never saw them in southern Indiana, but that was probably more a function of my lack of birdwatching than their absence.
__________________
Sandra's seen a leprechaun, Eddie touched a troll, Laurie danced with witches once, Charlie found some goblins' gold.
Donald heard a mermaid sing, Susie spied an elf, But all the magic I have known I've had to make myself.
- Shel Silverstein

Last edited by jasonpatterson; 23rd July 2012 at 09:05 PM.
jasonpatterson is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 4th August 2012, 08:00 PM   #181
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
I saw this Great Egret this morning along the Illinois River in central Illinois, USA...


These Great Egrets breed in our area in the summer, but spend the winter in Mexico and Central and South America. The similar sized Great Blue Heron is more common here, and as long as there is open water for fishing, they'll stay year round.
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 8th August 2012, 06:37 PM   #182
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
Juvenile male Ruby-Throated Hummingbird, central Illinois, USA...


The adult males are heading south already, but the females and juveniles will stay around this area for as long as a couple more months.
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th August 2012, 04:11 AM   #183
sphenisc
Illuminator
 
sphenisc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 3,824
Stilt Sandpiper: Northumberland, UK, the 28th in Britain since 1950. I took lousy pictures not worth posting.
sphenisc is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th August 2012, 06:32 AM   #184
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
Originally Posted by GeeMack View Post
Juvenile male Ruby-Throated Hummingbird, central Illinois, USA...
That's a heckuva picture!
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th August 2012, 06:52 AM   #185
RedIbis
Philosopher
 
RedIbis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6,888
Originally Posted by Humanzee View Post
Is that a Rose-breasted Grossbeak, NoahFence?
Yes, that is a Rose-breased Grosbeak in Noah's pic.

I spent a month in W. North Carolina this summer and got six lifers: Red Crossbill, Ruffed Grouse, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Winter Wren, Broad-winged Hawk, and Canada Warbler.

Looking forward to a productive fall migration here in W. Florida.

BTW, to those asking about Tanagers and Orioles, they passed through W. Florida in the spring in very abundant numbers, both Scarlet and Summer Tanager, Baltimore and Orchard Orioles. The spring was particularly good this year for migrants.
__________________
(RedIbis, on the other hand, exists to me only in quoted form). - Gravy (Mark Roberts)
RedIbis is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 9th August 2012, 07:56 AM   #186
The Shrike
Master Poster
 
The Shrike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 2,393
Originally Posted by Zax63 View Post
. . . using the Birds Of Pennsylvania Field Guide by Stan Tekiela, are correct.
Tekeila has developed this niche for making nature guides that depict some of the species that live in certain arbitrarily defined geographic areas. People buy them because they're cheap and have pretty pictures, but they're really not useful as field guides.

I'm going to play my professional ornithologist's and 35-year birder's card to recommend what I think is hands-down the best field guide for beginning birders: James Coe's Eastern Birds: A Guide to Field Identification of North American Species (http://www.amazon.com/Eastern-Birds-.../dp/030713671X). (There is a companion Western Guide that would be appropriate for folks from the front range of the Rockies to the west, but I haven't used that one.)

Coe's artwork is superb, and the thing that I think helps the most is the way he presents species in an appropriate habitat context. The text is also good; the maps are lousy but they give you a general idea of distributions. This guide is small, cheap, and useful. I often keep multiple copies on hand to give to the budding birders I meet.

Go with Coe! If you get more serious about your birding (and you will if you use this guide!) then you can graduate to Sibley's.

Note: I am not James Coe. I just discovered this guide a few years ago and think it's remarkably underrated. It's a brilliant field guide that somehow has not benefited from the marketing campaigns devoted to other guides.

Last edited by The Shrike; 9th August 2012 at 07:57 AM. Reason: typo
The Shrike is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 18th August 2012, 09:19 PM   #187
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
This post isn't so much about birdwatching as it is about bird-trying-not-to-step-on.

There's a Rock Dove on my patio, and it's behaving very oddly. I don't know if it's suffered some brain injury (stroke, parasite?) or been poisoned or . . .

It's fluttering around on the ground, because it sometimes panics and tries to fly, but it can't. It has a bizarre habit of rotating its head 180 deg and then (seemingly) trying to rub the top of its head on the ground. At first I thought it was trying to attack me, but now I think that it sometimes tries to flee, but it can't control its direction very well so it winds up circling back very quickly. I've tried not to disturb it because I suspect it's injuring itself more when it tries to fly. The wings appear to be working just fine.

The bird, looking more-or-less normal (except that it's sitting on my lawn at night, and letting me get close enough to take this picture *without* a telephoto lens)


Looking at me oddly (this is not the twist-its-head-around trick)


Trying to fly away:


doing the head-twist (putting them in the spoiler box because I find these image more disturbing than some of the wasp pictures that I've been chided for not putting in a spoiler box):






It does the head-twist thing very quickly, and the conditions were already photographically challenging, so they aren't very sharp.


Has anyone encountered this sort of thing before? Is there anything I can do for it? I'm not optimistic about its chances of surviving the night in my backyard in that condition, but I doubt that it's going to recover regardless of how much nursing it gets. And I'm a little hesitant to spend a lot of time trying to rescue a member of (yet another) invasive species.
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 18th August 2012, 11:38 PM   #188
jasonpatterson
Philanthropic Misanthrope
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Space, The Final Frontier
Posts: 2,373
I've found birds that crashed into windows that behaved in similarly bizarre ways, though not the head twisting. It's also possible that it's a sick bird that you really don't want to touch. If it were in my yard I'd go the route of a quick and painless death for it.
__________________
Sandra's seen a leprechaun, Eddie touched a troll, Laurie danced with witches once, Charlie found some goblins' gold.
Donald heard a mermaid sing, Susie spied an elf, But all the magic I have known I've had to make myself.
- Shel Silverstein
jasonpatterson is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th August 2012, 09:16 AM   #189
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
Has anyone encountered this sort of thing before? Is there anything I can do for it? I'm not optimistic about its chances of surviving the night in my backyard in that condition, but I doubt that it's going to recover regardless of how much nursing it gets. And I'm a little hesitant to spend a lot of time trying to rescue a member of (yet another) invasive species.

I've seen a few sick ones acting weird. It could be that, but it looks more like it crashed into something, or maybe it was attacked and escaped with injuries. I found a Mourning Dove outside a few weeks ago that could walk perfectly well, but when it tried to fly it never could get past flopping around. Being it's just a Rock Dove, I'd probably be pretty quick to euthanize.
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th August 2012, 09:20 AM   #190
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
In Central Illinois, USA, our Ruby Throated Hummingbirds are fattening up for their long trip south. They're providing some pretty good opportunities to get nice photos even with just a 300mm lens.


Last edited by GeeMack; 20th August 2012 at 09:23 AM. Reason: Punctuation.
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th August 2012, 12:14 PM   #191
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
Originally Posted by GeeMack View Post
I've seen a few sick ones acting weird. It could be that, but it looks more like it crashed into something, or maybe it was attacked and escaped with injuries.
re attacked & injuries:
On the one hand, it's missing a few feathers from its back, which fits the 'attack' theory very nicely.
On the other hand, everything seems to be working. The wings seem to be good, the tail works find, it's not limping . . . I dunno.

If I were to guess, I'd guess that it's lost its sense of balance. Maybe it flew into a window and banged its head? I know very little of bird physiology.

Quote:
I found a Mourning Dove outside a few weeks ago that could walk perfectly well, but when it tried to fly it never could get past flopping around. Being it's just a Rock Dove, I'd probably be pretty quick to euthanize.
I left it to its own devices the first night, and was a little surprised to find it still alive in the morning. Especially since I checked on it once around midnight and when I flipped on the patio light, there was a cat seated about 5 meters away, watching the dove. The cat fled when it saw me.

So the next day, I tossed it some cracked corn and put a dish of water near it. It definitely eats the corn. It even seems to be recovering some; it's able to climb a bit without falling off, which is an improvement.

As of this morning, it was still there. I'm no longer sufficiently convinced that its death is imminent, so I wouldn't feel right about euthanizing it now (though I was pretty close the night I found it). I suspect that one of these days I'll come home and it'll be gone, and I'll never know if it flew off, or if a hawk got it, or whatever.
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th August 2012, 04:28 PM   #192
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
Originally Posted by GeeMack View Post
In Central Illinois, USA, our Ruby Throated Hummingbirds are fattening up for their long trip south. They're providing some pretty good opportunities to get nice photos even with just a 300mm lens.
Another impressive shot!
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th August 2012, 04:34 PM   #193
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post
I suspect that one of these days I'll come home and it'll be gone, and I'll never know if it flew off, or if a hawk got it, or whatever.
Right on schedule.

When I got home from work today, I went out to check on the bird and can't find it anywhere. No suspicious cloud of feathers, either.

I believe that if a cat got it, there would be feathers. But it's possible that a hawk carried it off, or that it simply flew away. Or bumbled its way over the fence and met the neighbor's dog.

Moving on . . .
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 20th August 2012, 05:26 PM   #194
PetersCreek
Muse
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 551
I've been meaning to post in this thread for a while now but I haven't done much more birding than what fell my way while doing other things.
Here's my 2012 list so far:
  • American Robin (Turdus migratorius)
  • Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)
  • Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon)
  • Black-billed Magpie (Pica pica)
  • Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus)
  • Black-legged Kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla)
  • Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)
  • Common Loon (Gavia immer)
  • Common Murre (Uria aalge)
  • Common Raven (Corvus corax)
  • Common Redpoll (Acanthis flammea)
  • Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis)
  • Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)
  • Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens)
  • Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus)
  • Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus)
  • Herring Gull (Larus argentatus)
  • Horned Puffin (Fratercula corniculata)
  • Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)
  • Merlin (Falco columbarius)
  • Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba)
  • Red-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta canadensis)
  • Red-necked Grebe (Podiceps grisegena)
  • Rock Pigeon (Columba livia)
  • Steller's Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri)
  • Tufted Puffin (Fratercula cirrhata)
  • Varied Thrush (Ixoreus naevius)
  • Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla)
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata)

We had another Steller's Jay show up at the house this year but he didn't hang around long. Still, he was some combination of bold and/or experienced because he took right to eating peanuts from my hand. Here are a couple of videos:

Another Steller's Jay
I'm Just Here For the Peanuts

A new bird for my life list was the Merlin that showed up in our neighborhood 2 or 3 weeks ago. He flew over the house keening a few times, then settled somewhere around the neighbor's house up the mountain from us where he keened it up for a bit more before moving on.

I had a close encounter with a bald eagle a couple of weekends ago. I was on a small lake in the Mat-Su valley, flyfishing in my float tube, where I had caught and released a small trout. It must have been hooked deeper than I thought because I saw him a few minutes later, struggling belly up at the surface not too far from me. Before I could retrieve it, a couple of seagulls started trying (unsuccessfully) to do something with it. A minute later, they took off in a snit as a bald eagle descended from my left, circled behind me and to my right, and snatched the trout from the water, about 20-25 feet from me. All this, much too quick to get my cell phone out of my pocket for a picture, unfortunately.
PetersCreek is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st August 2012, 06:17 PM   #195
Kotatsu
Phthirapterist
 
Kotatsu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Good Anvil
Posts: 2,229
Hi everyone,

As I think I mentioned earlier, I have moved from Sweden to Salt Lake City (although I have no internet at home yet, mainly due to the exasperating inefficiency of Comcast...). Haven't had much time to birdwatch yet, but have got 11 new species so far:

Spotted Sandpiper Actitis macularia
Scrub Jay Aphelocome californica
California Quail Callipepla california
Pine Siskin Carduelis pinus
Lesser Goldfinch Carduelis psaltria
American Crow Corvus brachyrhynchos
American Kestrel Falco sparverius
Black-billed Magpie Pica hudsonia
Western Tanager Piranga ludoviciana
Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher Polioptila caerulea

In total, my US list is at 46 species, I think. Hopefully, I will go with my new boss and some others to Antelope Island when the shorebird migration starts, and there's been some talk of joining a bird banding group in Red Butte Canyon (we need North American lice!), so I'm hoping to get above 1000 bird species before I leave Utah (less than 120 left!).

Cheers,
Leo
__________________
"It is not supposed to be funny or annoying or insightful, because it is neither; nor to convey or express any emotion or wit, because it doesn't; nor to be any kind of art, because it isn't; but merely to be repetitive. It is repetition for the sake of repetition; mindless, relentless, remorseless and -- ultimately -- redundant." K. Krishnamurthi, "The Seven Forms of Repetition", 1972.
Kotatsu is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st August 2012, 09:08 PM   #196
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
Made it back down to Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve in Huntington Beach, CA, today. In my mind, this will forever be the 'day of the raptors' because I got some of my best raptor pics ever.

In that vein:

Juvie red-tailed hawk (on Flickr)


Osprey, guarding its dinner


Juvenile Northern goshawk flyover

and, not a raptor but a hunter nonetheless:

Reddish Egret, on the prowl, as usual

It's conceivable that I've misidentified the goshawk and the red-tailed hawk. Frankly, I'd be delighted if it's anything but a red-tailed hawk, 'cause pretty much anything else would be less common.

I'll try to put together the full bird list in a few days.
__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 21st August 2012, 09:30 PM   #197
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
Originally Posted by dasmiller View Post

I love those heron/egret birds. A few days ago we were walking along the Illinois River here and saw a few Great Blue Herons, a couple of Great Egrets, and a Little Green Heron. The Black Crowned Night Heron is supposed to be in our area, too, but I've only seen them in Florida.
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 22nd August 2012, 08:20 PM   #198
JeanFromBNA
Critical Thinker
 
JeanFromBNA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 416
Dasmiller, wonderful pictures of raptors and fishers.
JeanFromBNA is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 25th August 2012, 05:01 PM   #199
GeeMack
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Not Bandiagara
Posts: 7,241
Originally Posted by GeeMack View Post
I love those heron/egret birds. A few days ago we were walking along the Illinois River here and saw a few Great Blue Herons, a couple of Great Egrets, and a Little Green Heron. The Black Crowned Night Heron is supposed to be in our area, too, but I've only seen them in Florida.

We went to the Emiquon National Wildlife Refuge early this morning. It's an extraordinary area comprised of several thousand acres of reclaimed Illinois River floodplain. For almost a century it had been used as agricultural land. Levees were built and pumps were in constant use to keep it arable. Just less than 20 years ago the Nature Conservancy began acquiring the land, and only 5 years ago the pumps were turned off and the land began to revert to marshes and shallow lakes. Already it has become a premiere stop-over for migrating waterfowl and shorebirds.


Now we can go just an hour from home and see birds we would never have seen just a decade ago. The Osprey above spent several minutes hovering and soaring overhead and gave us a really good look even if not the greatest photograph. And finally we did see the Black Crowned Night Heron... right here in central Illinois, USA!

Last edited by GeeMack; 25th August 2012 at 05:12 PM. Reason: Grammar.
GeeMack is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Old 2nd September 2012, 08:11 AM   #200
dasmiller
Just the right amount of cowbell
 
dasmiller's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Well past Hither, looking for Yon
Posts: 4,194
Went to Ballona Creek yesterday morning. There's just not a lot there this time of year, and even at the best of times, I rarely get really good pictures there.

I think I counted 15 species, not including a few passing gulls. But that 15 does include crows, mourning doves, mallards, a starling, and other not-terribly-noteworthy birds.

But there was a white-tailed kite flying around, and while it wasn't close enough for great pictures, it was close enough for 'maybe' pictures. This is only the 2nd time I've seen a kite, and the previous time was much farther away and I had to identify it from the picture once I got home.

So not-quite-a-first for me, but close.

__________________
"In times of war, we need warriors. But this isn't a war." - Phil Plaitt
dasmiller is offline   Quote this post in a PM   Nominate this post for this month's language award Copy a direct link to this post Reply With Quote Back to Top
Reply

JREF Forum » General Topics » Science, Mathematics, Medicine, and Technology

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:58 AM.
Powered by vBulletin. Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
2001-2013, James Randi Educational Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

Disclaimer: Messages posted in the Forum are solely the opinion of their authors.